A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

  • Allee Chapel (est. 1957) — Allee Chapel seats 80 occupants, and hosts a variety of religious services. It is open daily from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. for private prayer, meditation, and reflection.
  • Armstrong Hall (est. 1938) — Armstrong Hall is home to the departments of music, theatre, and dance. It is connected to Youngker Hall.
  • Bowman-Carter Hall (est. 1885) — Bowman-Carter Hall was the first women's residence hall west of the Mississippi. It remains a women's residence hall, but has had some updates since it was built, which include a TV area, kitchen, and sinks in the rooms on floors 2-4.
  • Brackett House B&B (est. 1877) — Brackett House is an event space which was remodeled in 2015-16 as a bed-and-breakfast. 
  • Cole Library (est. 1957) — Built to replace Cornell's 1905 Carnegie Library, serving both the college and the town of Mount Vernon, Cole Library is believed to be the only private college/community-shared library in the nation. Cole Library is home to the Center for Teaching and Learning (Writing Studio, Quantitative Reasoning Studio, Technology Studio).
  • College Hall (est. 1857) — College Hall is the second oldest academic building on campus. Besides classrooms, this building has contained laboratories, halls for the Literary Societies and other student organizations, a library, gymnasium, armory for the Cornell Cadets, and, until 1959, administrative offices. Classes currently held in College Hall: Economics and Business, Education, French, German, Greek, History, Latin, Religion, Russian, Sociology and Anthropology, and Spanish.
  • Cottage House (est. 1900) — Cottage House is an arts and crafts cottage, residence hall, and home to Third Wave Resource Group members.
  • Dows Hall (est. 1963) — Dows Hall is a residence hall in the tri-hall area of campus, along with Tarr Hall and Pfeiffer Hall. It contains a kitchen, aerobics room, individual study room, and group conference room.
  • Ebersole Center (est. 1955) — The Ebersole Center is home to student health, counseling, and campus safety.
  • Garner President's House (est. 1850) — Garner President's House predates the college, and on the property lives the largest gingko tree in Iowa. It is the home of all but three of Cornell's 15 presidents. It currently serves as both the primary residence for the president and family, as well as a social space where an average of 50 events are held each year.
  • Hansen House — Named for its former owner, Federal Circuit Court Judge David Hansen, who regularly team-taught a course in the Politics Department, Hansen House currently serves as the home of the campus IT department.
  • King Chapel (est. 1882) — King Chapel hosts events such as convocations, concerts, lectures, and guest speakers. The auditorium, which seats 700, has seen many famous speakers throughout the years, including Martin Luther King Jr., Gloria Steinem, John Denver, Frank Lloyd Wright, Robert Frost, and more.
  • Law Hall (est. 1925) — Law Hall is home to math, psychology, and computer science classes, as well as the famous moose head that has resided there since 1925 (the sole survivor of a natural history museum the college once operated).
  • Luce Admission Center (est. 1884) — Luce Admissions Center has been the headquarters of the Office of Enrollment Services since 1975, containing the Admissions Department and the Marketing & Communications Department. 
  • Lytle House (est. 1884) — Lytle House is a classroom building purchased in 1906 for the Cornell Conservatory of Music. Since then, Lytle House has held the Department of Home Economics (1961-80), philosophy, and later, kinesiology.
  • McWethy Hall (est. 1909) — McWethy Hall is known for being the only building designed by a Cornellian. It currently serves as the home of the Art Department, as well as the Peter Paul Luce Gallery.
  • Merner Hall (est. 1936) — Merner Hall is a residence hall. It contains an academic classroom, kitchen, large lounge, meeting room, and elevator.
  • Norton Geology Center (est. 1905) — The Norton Geology Center was originally the Carnegie Library. Its name honors the man who was Cornell's first professor of Geology and curator of its original museum (opened in 1880). An extensive collection of geological books, maps, periodicals, and more than 20,000 specimens of rocks, minerals, and fossils are stored within the center. Geology and environmental studies classes are held here.
  • Old Sem (est. 1853) — Cornell was known for its first four years as the Iowa Conference Seminary, and its original building was the Seminary Building, today known as Old Sem. It initially contained the chapel, music and recitation rooms, a kitchen and dining room, and housed some of the faculty and students. The building burned down to its masonry shell in 1924. Since 1959 it has housed administrative offices, which include Student Affairs, the Registrar's Office, HR, the Business Office, Off-Campus Studies, and the President's office. 
  • Olin Hall (est. 1955) — A gift of the F. W. Olin Foundation, Olin Hall was the largest campus residence for men from its beginning until 1996, when it became a coed residence hall.
  • Pauley-Rorem Hall (est. 1963) — A first-year student residence hall, featuring a pool table, table tennis tables, an individual study room, group study or conference rooms, a sand volleyball pit, and an outdoor patio.
  • Pfeiffer Hall (est. 1930) — Pfeiffer Hall was a women's residence hall until 1978, when it became coeducational. It is in the center of the tri-hall area between Dows Hall and Tarr Hall, and contains lounges, kitchens, an academic classroom, and elevator.
  • Platner House (est. 1892) — Platner House is one of Mount Vernon's former mansions. It was purchased in 1963 and served as the music practice house until the renovation of Armstrong Hall in 2003.
  • Prall House (est. 1913) — Acquired by the college in 1992, Prall House currently houses the religion and philosophy departments.
  • Russell Hall (est. 2007) — Adjacent to Pauley-Rorem, this residence hall is home to our four-person suites which include a common living space, a bathroom with a private shower and toilet, two single rooms and one double occupancy room, a sitting area, and community room with a kitchen, and a study room.
  • Russell Science Center (est. 2018) — Russell Science Center, part of the $35 million Greater > Than campaign science facilities project, is the first academic building designed for the block plan. It was launched with the largest cash gift in Cornell history – $20 million from Jean Russell '65, a researcher who made important discoveries about bone disease. Chemistry, biology, and biochemistry & molecular biology classes are held in this building.
  • Scott Alumni Center (est. 1883) — Scott Alumni Center began as three separate buildings which were joined together into what was traditionally but not exclusively a women's residence hall. The last students moved out in January 2009 and the building was transformed into professional offices for Alumni and College Advancement. 
  • Small Multi-Sport Center (est. 1953) — The Small Multi-Sport Center is a competition venue for track and field and tennis. Practices for many of Cornell's 19 sports teams are held here. It contains training rooms, a 2,000 seat gymnasium for basketball, volleyball, and wrestling, batting cages for baseball and softball, hitting nets for golf, a wrestling room, and a weight room. 
  • Smith Hall (est. 2005) — Smith Hall is a residence hall with six suites (two per floor) accommodating eight students apiece in four double-occupancy rooms. 
  • South Hall (est. 1873) — South Hall is home to the politics and English & creative writing departments.
  • Tarr Hall (est. 1965) — Tarr Hall is a residence hall in the tri-hall area with Dows Hall and Pfeiffer Hall. It contains a performance stage, study room, and group study room.
  • Thomas Commons (est. 1966) — The Thomas Commons provides centralized dining and recreational facilities for the college community, all centered around the Orange Carpet event area. It contains a large front lounge with a fireplace, the Info Desk, the Hilltop Café dining area, Zamora's Marketplace snack bar, eight classrooms, the Roe Howard Fitness Center, the Berry Career Institute, the Cornell Well-being Network, the Bookstore, offices for student government, the Office of Civic Engagement, the Mail and Service Center, KRNL-FM (the student-operated radio station), and two outdoor patios.
  • Van Etten-Lacey House (est. 1937) — A hand-built limestone home, Van Etten-Lacey House opened in 2012 for The Center for the Literary Arts and houses a classroom and the Foxden Press, a letterden printing press. It also often hosts literary events.
  • Van Metre Field at Ash Park (est. 1922) — The stadium, named in honor of the Van Metre family, hosts football, lacrosse, and track & field competitions.
  • West Hall (est. 1976) — West Hall was renovated and reopened in 2019 for physics and engineering, computer science, and mathematics and statistics classes.
  • Youngker Hall (est. 2002) — Youngker Hall is home of the 265-seat Kimmel Theatre, the Berry Lobby, and the Grand Lobby.