101. Sociological Thinking
Do you wonder why people do the things they do?  Why society works as it does?  Ever think the world is “unfair”?  Sociologists study people in the world, looking at patterns, at differences, at inequalities.  Thinking sociologically is like “entering a new and unfamiliar society--one in which things are no longer what they seem.”  It creates “culture shock without geographical displacement.”  This course requires us to look at society with a new perspective, to question our taken-for-granted assumptions, to investigate people's actions, and to explore the organization of society.  It provides a basis for being engaged citizens, thinking about social alternatives, and imagining possibilities for social justice.  Not open to seniors without permission of the instructor. (Social Science)

102. Topics in Sociological Thinking
The course is a version of Sociological Thinking (SOC 101) with a more specific topic focus. See Topics Courses for current topics and descriptions. Credit may be given for either 101 or 102, but not for both. Not open to seniors without permission of the instructor. (Social Science)

246. Gender Diversity
This course will focus on diverse gender identities, bodies, and social presentations. Social practices and pressures of gender will be examined in order to gain insight into the larger contemporary social meanings of gender. We will explore how individuals interpret and present their gender identities, the constraints on such interpretations and presentations, and the larger social implications of gender diversity and gender regulation on cultural ideals. Alternate years. This course may count toward the SOC, SAN, or GSS major. (Social Science)

248. American Indians: Culture, Activism, and Social Justice
American Indians: Culture, Activism, and Social Justice Distinctive aspects of Native American tribes and analysis of the ways in which contemporary tribal cultures are influenced by their unique relationship with the federal government. An analysis of treaty rights, the nature of tribal self-determination, and the goals of current tribal activism. Topics covered include tribal efforts to control reservation development, to protect sacred environments, and to preserve tribal cultures. Prerequisite: SOC 101, SOC 102, or EST 123 or permission of instructor. Alternate years. (Social Science)

255. Media and the Public Mind
An examination of the underlying organization of the broadcast, print, and electronic media and their role in shaping perceptions, ideologies, and behavior. May emphasize the news, advertising, media representations, and the political economy of the media. Prerequisite: SOC  101 or 102. Alternate years. This course may count toward the SOC, SAN, or GSS major. (Social Science)

256-260. Topics in Sociology
Selected topics of current interest in sociology. See Topics Courses.

273. Families and Family Policy
This course examines current public debates and social policies related to “The Family” from a sociological perspective, with an emphasis on the complex and diverse family experiences and patterns in the contemporary United States.  The course we will explore family meanings, functions, and structures , the ways that the larger social and cultural contexts impact family life, and family-related policy initiatives.  When in Chicago we will explore the range of services provided by community organizations to empower youth, families, and communities. Registration, when the course is taught off campus, entails additional costs. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or 102. Alternate years. This course may count toward the SOC, SAN, or GSS major. (Social Science)

280/380. Internship: See Additional Academic Programs, All-College Independent Study Courses 280/380.

290/390. Individual Project: See Additional Academic Programs, All-College Independent Study Courses 290/390.

314. Community Organizing, Public Policy, and Social Change
Communities play various roles in perpetuating and challenging contemporary social problems such as racial segregation, poverty, health disparities, educational inequity, gender/sexuality discrimination, and environmental injustices. Using Chicago as a case study, this course examines contemporary debates and social policies affecting cities; investigates the interplay between policy implementation and local efforts to make change; and explores the role of governments, non-profits, and individuals in addressing inequality. Typically travels to Chicago to meet with local organizations working on social change and policy reform related to urban inequality. Registration, when the course is taught off campus, entails additional costs. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or 102. Alternate years. (Social Science)

315. Wealth, Power, and Inequality
Emphasizes the importance of socio-economic class by exploring the meaning and measurement of social class, how social classes are formed, and how they change. Explores issues of social mobility, investigates the relationship between various forms of inequality (i.e., social class, race-ethnicity, gender, sexuality) and contemplates the role of culture and social institutions, (e.g., work, the health care system, schools, families, the political systems, etc.) in perpetuating, legitimizing, and sometimes challenging social inequality. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or 102. Alternate years. (Social Science)

316. Culture, Meaning-Making, and Distinction in American Society
Theoretical and sociological investigation of the concept of "culture." Explores the connections between culture, structure, and society as a whole; specifically addresses the ways that symbols, language, and other forms of knowledge work to create meanings, constitute power, and form the basis for understanding social life including relationships, politics, sexuality, and work. Considers the creation and reception of culture; the relationship between culture and inequality; issues of domination and resistance, and the connections between culture and social/historical change. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or 102. Recommended prerequisite: one additional sociology course. Alternate years. (Social Science)

317. Reproductive Practices, Reproductive Policies
This course emphasizes the social construction of female reproductive processes and how culture and institutions shape our understandings and expectations of such processes. Addresses a variety of reproductive practices, experiences and ideologies. Discusses ideas about womanhood, motherhood, fatherhood, sexuality, eugenics, and reproductive freedom; investigates historical role and effect of the state, medical institutions, and women themselves as they struggle over, and shape such issues. The focus will be on the U.S., but we may also look at cases from other countries in order to examine our assumptions about reproductive practices and strategies. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or 102. Alternate years. This course may count toward the SOC, SAN, or GSS major. (Social Science)

343. Women: Oppressions and Resistances
Consideration of gender inequality as lived reality and locus of struggle. Topics include: cross-cultural analysis of sexual/racial violence, including violence in war; women's resistances in civil rights, indigenous, development and human rights struggles. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or 102. Alternate years. This course may count toward the SOC, SAN, or GSS major. (Social Science)

348. Race and Ethnic Relations
Various theoretical perspectives on race and ethnic relations, focusing on the United States. Topics include assimilation, ethnic conflict and U.S. immigration policy, the history of the civil rights, treaty rights and migrant farm worker struggles, the social construction of race, and signs of change in contemporary race and ethnic relations. Prerequisite: SOC 101, SOC 102,  or EST 123. Alternate years. (Social Science)

350-360. Advanced Topics in Sociology
Selected topics of current interest in sociology. See Topics Courses. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or 102.

362. Criminal Justice
Analysis of the criminal justice system in the U.S., including consideration of the police, the courts, and correctional institutions. Focus on contemporary problems and reform movements. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or SOC102.  Offered subject to availability of faculty. (Social Science)

364. Deviance and Social Control
Investigates the ways in which deviance and social control operate in daily life.  Considers the “social construction of deviance, “ and the ways in which constructions of deviance can lead to inequalities. Also investigates formal institutions of social control such as the criminal justice system/prisons, the mental/medical health field, and the education system. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or 102. Alternate years. (Social Science)

365. Sexualities
Investigates sexuality as a social phenomenon, focusing on the "social construction of sexuality" or the myriad ways that individuals and societies regulate and attach meaning to emotions, desires, interactions, and relations. Examines the social organization of sexuality, social control over sexual behavior, and the historical and cultural diversity of sexual attitudes, behaviors, identities and signifiers. Prerequisite: SOC 101, SOC 102, or GSS 171. Alternate years. This course may count toward the SOC, SAN, or GSS major. (Social Science)

366. Gender Differences and Inequalities
Our ideas about gender organize our social life in important ways that we often do not even notice. These ideas, our gendered interactions, and the gendered dimensions of social institutions are largely invisible to us, and we often take them for granted as the “normal” or natural way life works. Sociology asks us to investigate and expose the aspects of social life we take for granted. In this course, we explore how social interactions, ideologies, and institutions reproduce gender difference and gender inequality, and at times, challenge contemporary gender roles, norms, and stereotypes. Prerequisite: SOC 101, SOC 102, or GSS 171. Alternate years. This course may count toward the SOC, SAN, or GSS major. (Social Science)

367. Self and Identity
Examines the construction, negotiation, and representation of the self and social identities. Explores differing theoretical approaches to understanding identity, considers the tensions and conflicts of identification, and investigates the relations between social identities, groups, cultures, and institutions. Identities, cultures, and social movements developed around sexuality, gender, race/ethnicity, disability and other social statuses are examined. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or 102. Recommended prerequisite: one additional course in Sociology beyond 101 or 102. Alternate years. This course may count toward the SOC, SAN, or GSS major. (Social Science)

368. Sociology of the Body
This course examines social, cultural and political perspectives on the body, with a focus on body modifications. We will consider material and symbolic aspects of the body; body modifications as social practices; social regulation of bodies, the negotiation of the self within various social conditions, contexts, and ideologies; and the relationship of bodies to gender, class, race/ethnicity, and nationalism. Special emphasis given to the construction of ‘normal’ bodies (linked to medicine, technology, consumption, and other institutions) as well as the construction of ‘deviant’ or ‘transgressive’ bodies. Prerequisite: SOC 101, SOC 102, or GSS 171. Alternate years.  This course may count toward the SOC, SAN, or GSS major. (Social Science) DAVIS

370. Religion, Spirituality, and Community
Examines the religious experience; the provision of meaning and belonging; religious commitment and conversion; official and nonofficial religion; the dynamics of religious collectivities; religion, cohesion, and conflict; religion and social inequality; and religious movements and social change. Topics include women's spirituality and modern witchcraft communities, Native Americans and the sacred earth, and civil rights and faith-based social change. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or 102. Alternate years. (Social Science)

376. The African American Civil Rights Movement through Film
Examination of the modern Civil Rights Movement through text and film. Consideration of the development of the movement through social protest and legal action, goals of the movement from integration to Black Power, and factors involved in emergence of the movement including the development of a Western racial worldview and the emergence of anti-colonial movements worldwide. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or 102. Alternate years. (Social Science)

483. Sociological Theory
Classical theories of social structure and social change, focused on the works of Marx, Durkheim, and Weber. Prerequisites: SOC 101 or 102, and one 300-level Sociology course. No S/U option. (Social Science)

484. Research Design and Data Analysis
Focus on the logic and procedure of sociological research. Explores the epistemological and methodological principles that form the basis of social research, including developing research questions, forming measurable concepts, determining appropriate research strategies, confronting ethical dilemmas, collecting and analyzing data, and revising theories in light of empirical data. Exploration and evaluation of various research methodologies as well as the development of an independent research project. Prerequisites: two courses in Sociology, including SOC 101 or 102. No S/U option. (Social Science)

485. Readings/Research in Sociology (1/2-1)
Student-designed individual research in selected areas. May be repeated for credit; however, no more than one term of 485 may be counted toward the Sociology major or the Sociology and Anthropology major. Prerequisites: two courses in Sociology, including SOC 101 or 102. (OP)

487. Advanced Research and Writing in Sociology and Anthropology
Course explores current theoretical and methodological issues in the field of sociology, and in the interdisciplinary field of sociology and anthropology through the production of student-designed individual research. Through this capstone experience, students will develop advanced research and writing skills through the completion of an independent research project. The project requires the integration of theory and research/practice through a qualitative or quantitative research report, policy white paper, grant application, internship analysis, and/or some other form of advanced sociological and/or anthropological writing. Prerequisites: senior standing with a declared Sociology major or Sociology and Anthropology Interdisciplinary major. No S/U option. (Social Science)

511. Extended Research in Sociology (1/4)
Students will pursue an empirical problem through a new qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methods research project or substantially revise and expand an existing research project. Over the course of four blocks, students will engage in research design and implementation.  Course will require 2-3 hours of work per week. Prerequisites: SOC 484 or ANT 484, and permission of instructor. (CR)