Floor meetings are a great time to connect with residents and to pass along information. Meeting with your floor at least once a block to address concerns, discuss upcoming campus events, and to offer time for socializing and engagement can be a very powerful tool as you continually work to build your community.

While it's important for each staff member to find their own style and determine what works best for their community, we recognize that some may not have had to lead their own meetings before. Below are sample first floor meeting agendas that you can utilize. As you lead your meetings please consider the following tips:

  • Have a purpose for the meeting. Meeting just to meet takes away from the effectiveness of the interaction.
  • Plan what you're going to talk about in advance. This will help you be more confident in leading the meeting and you'll be less likely to leave out something important.
  • Be prepared.  If you're doing an ice breaker or other activity, make sure it's ready before the meeting starts.
  • Use your time wisely and multi-task. Can you be talking about business at the same time people are doing an activity?
  • Know what your talking about. This will help you be thorough and concise, and you'll be able to better answer any questions that come up.
  • Follow up with residents after the meeting. Get their feedback on what they liked or didn't like and adapt your meetings in the future.

Sample First-Year Floor First Floor Meeting

Introduce yourself- share your name, room number, and what you are excited about for the coming year. This is a time for you to show your residents who you are. Make sure to have some energy and excitement in your presentation style to engage the residents.

  • Talk about the role of the RA on the floor. What are your responsibilities? When should residents come to you? What kinds of help can you offer your residents?

  • Ask that the students introduce themselves. A game is not necessary, but it is an easy way to get everyone to participate fully in the activity. A good introductory game is the M&M game. Have each student take M&Ms, and for each piece of candy they take, they need to share one fact about themselves. A twist can include that for each color of candy, they need to share something on a specific topic. For example:

    • Red: Family
    • Blue: Academics
    • Green: Activities
    • Yellow: Hobbies
  • Share important policies that they need to know. Be specific when talking about these policies and mention where they can be found online. It is important to spend an adequate amount of time on this portion of your floor meeting. Make sure to give the residents a chance to ask questions. If you do not know the answer, please ask your AD.

    • Alcohol policy
    • Good Samaritan Statement
    • Bathrooms
    • Storage/Maintenance Requests
    • Quiet hours
    • Review of all of the common spaces in the building (i.e. where laundry is located, bathrooms, trash, and lounges)
    • Who the other staff members are in the building
  • Discuss any additional community expectations you have or that the residents have for each other
  • Talk about need to be responsible for personal safety and the safety of others. Also, discuss what to do in the event of an emergency, such as fire or severe weather.

  • Discuss programming, ask what your residents would like to do.

Sample First-Year Floor First Floor Meeting

Introduce yourself- share your name, room number, and what you are excited about for the coming year. This is a time for you to show your residents who you are. Make sure to have some energy and excitement in your presentation style to engage the residents.

  • Talk about the role of the RA on the floor. What are your responsibilities? When should residents come to you? What kinds of help can you offer your residents?
  • Ask that the students introduce themselves. A game is not necessary, but it would be interesting to see if the students would participate. A good introductory game is the M&M game. Have each student take M&Ms, and for each piece of candy they take, they need to share one fact about themselves. A twist can include that for each color of candy, they need to share something on a specific topic. For example:
    • Red: Family
    • Blue: Academics
    • Green: Activities
    • Yellow: Hobbies
  • You can make the list reflect your floor and what they would most likely be willing to share with the group.
  • Share important policies that they need to know. Upper class students have been on campus before; therefore, it is not necessary to drill the policies during this meeting. The reminders should include:
    • Alcohol policy
    • Good Samaritan Statement
    • Bathrooms
    • Storage/Maintenance Requests
    • Quiet hours
    • Review of all of the common spaces in the building (i.e. where laundry is located, bathrooms, trash, and lounges)
    • Who the other staff members are in the building
  • Discuss any additional community expectations you have or that the residents have for each other
  • Talk about need to be responsible for personal safety and the safety of others. Also, discuss what to do in the event of an emergency, such as fire or severe weather.
  • Discuss programming, ask what your residents would like to do.