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complement our readings of texts. Some readings are in English to provide background
historical and cultural information, but all primary texts are in French. Prerequisite: FRE 301 or
permission of the instructor. FRE 311 or 312 strongly recommended. Offered every third year.
(Humanities)

331. Enlightenment: Eighteenth Century French Literature
France’s fiercely secular understanding of citizenship can be traced back to the Enlightenment
period which culminated in the violent revolution of 1789. French philosophes such as Voltaire,
Rousseau, Diderot, and Montesquieu, united in their belief in the supreme power of human
reason, waged fierce opposition to the social and political constraints of religious authority that
undergirded the Old Regime and promoted an international republic of letters founded on
freedom of expression and human rights. This course focuses on works by the philosophes with
attention to the limits of French Enlightenment thinking with respect to differences of race and
gender. Alternative voices of important historical actors such as Olympe de Gouges, a feminist
abolitionist, and Toussaint l’Ouverture, leader of the Haitian Revolution of 1791-1804, will also
be considered. Prerequisite: FRE 301. FRE311 or FRE 312 is strongly recommended. Offered

every third year. (Humanities)

353. Race and Immigration in French Film
Issues surrounding race and immigration are the focus of much attention in the United States,
and such issues are similarly important topics of discussion in France. However, the French
context of race and immigration varies from its American counterpart, and this means that
related questions are differently defined, constructed, and understood. France's long colonial
history plays no small part in generating and continuing conversations on the matters of race
and immigration, and its policy of assimilation vis à vis immigrants and (formerly) colonized
peoples has frequently resulted in debate, protest, and legislation. We will examine
constructions of race and portrayals of immigration in French-language films primarily from
France. Special attention will be paid to intersections of class and gender with race and
immigration. Readings will be provided to buttress understanding of the historical and social
contexts as well as to contribute to comprehension of some critical race theory. This course also
counts towards the GSS major. Prerequisite: FRE 301 or permission of the instructor. FRE 311

or 312 strongly recommended. Offered every third year. (Humanities)

354. Sporting Identities
What can an examination of sports tell us about national cultures and identities in the French-
speaking world? How do sports affect—and how are they affected by—gender, class, and race?
How do sports and sports narratives change over time and how does this influence the meanings
and messages they propagate or are made to carry? Do the same sports mean the same things
for different cultures, or even for different people? Through various literary and cultural texts—
photographs, films, short stories, non-fiction, etc.—we will examine the role of sports and sports
narratives in creating, resisting, shifting, or maintaining elements of cultures and identities.
Students do not need to have any familiarity with sports to take this class, but they do need to
have met the prerequisites for taking upper-level courses in French, as the course will be
conducted in French. Prerequisites: This course also counts towards the GSS major.
Prerequisite: FRE 301 or permission of the instructor. FRE 311 or 312 strongly recommended.

(Humanities)

365-366. Advanced Topics in French or Francophone literature or culture.  88
See Topics Courses.

Cornell College 2016-17 Academic Catalogue
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