Page 66 - Catalogue 2015-2016
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Artists covered include Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael, Donatello, and Titian.
Elective for Medieval and Early Modern Studies majors. No S/U option. [AH] (Humanities)

257. Medusa's Gaze: Art/Age of Galileo
Visual arts of Western Europe, from the early seventeenth century to the mid-eighteenth
century. Examples of seventeenth-century artists include Caravaggio, Bernini, Borromini,
Gentileschi, Rubens, Rembrandt, and Vermeer. Alternate years. Elective for Medieval and Early
Modern Studies majors. No S/U option. [AH] (Humanities)

259. Art, Identity, and Revolution: Late Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Art
Investigation of four European movements (Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, and
Impressionism) from the mid-eighteenth century through the nineteenth century. Subject to
availability of faculty. No S/U option. [AH] (Humanities)

260. Modern Art
Investigation of the development of Modernism and its demise during the second half of the
twentieth century. Multiple styles are discussed from the late nineteenth century to 1960. No
S/U option. [AH] (Humanities)

263. The Arts of West and Central Africa
Survey of the visual arts of Africa south of the Sahara based on the cycle of life in Africa. Culture
and art objects will be discussed thematically, focusing on issues of birth and abundance,
initiations, sexuality and partnership, status and royalty, secret societies, as well as death and
the ancestors. Topics discussed will include traditional dress, decorated utensils and weapons,
body arts, sculpture, painting, weaving, pottery, and architecture. The emphasis will be placed
on the object as art form and as conceptual tool to translate socio-political ideas. Offered every
third year. Elective for Ethnic Studies major. No S/U option. [AH] (Humanities)

264. African American Art: Intersectionality in the United States
This course provides an introduction to the visual arts produced by people of African descent in
the United States from colonial times to the present. Artists, art movements, the relationship of
art to politics, and the formation of racial and cultural identity will be examined. The emphasis
will be placed on the object as art form and as conceptual tool to translate socio-political ideas.
This course also counts towards the GSS major. Offered every third year. No S/U option. [AH]
(Humanities)

265. Arts of the African Diaspora: Latin America and the Caribbean
In this course, the religious and aesthetic practices of West and Central Africa and their
significance, preservation, and transformation in the Americas from the period of slavery to the
present will be examined. The focus of the class will be on the arts of Haiti, Cuba, Mexico, and
Brazil. No S/U option. [AH] (Humanities)

266. American Indian Art: Gender and the Marketplace
Introduces students to traditional and contemporary art made by indigenous individuals and
groups in North America. Participants examine sculpture, painting, pottery, textiles, and human
adornment. The course is organized according to cultural areas; however, common thematic
issues and the effects of colonialism are stressed in discussion and assigned readings. This
course also counts towards the GSS major. Offered every third year. No S/U option. [AH]
(Humanities)

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