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223. Utilitarian Ceramics
What is the “language” of pottery and how does it differ from sculpture? What details must
artists consider as they create objects for the purpose of utility? In this course, students will use
clay to explore pottery forms and the role of functionality today. Students will learn both wheel-
throwing and hand-building techniques in order to create utilitarian ceramic objects. Both
historical and contemporary pottery will be explored through studio projects, art historical
readings/presentations, and individual research. Students will be involved in every step of the
ceramic process from mixing clay, forming and glazing functional works of art, and
loading/firing kilns. Prerequisite: any 100 level Studio Art course. No S/U option. [SA] (Fine
Arts)

224. Sculptural Ceramics
How does ceramics straddle the line between craft and high art? How does an artist use a
traditional craft medium, clay, in order to explore sophisticated concepts/ideas? In this course,
students will focus on clay as a sculptural medium. Students will learn hand-building
techniques, including pinch, coil, and slab, in order to create clay sculptures. The role and
processes of ceramic sculpture will be explored through studio projects, art historical
readings/presentations, and individual research. Students will be involved in every step of the
ceramic process from mixing clay, forming and glazing sculptural works of art, and
loading/firing kilns. Prerequisite: any 100 level Studio Art course. No S/U option. [SA] (Fine
Arts)

232; 332. Drawing Life I and II
A variety of drawing techniques and concepts explored with emphasis on the human figure. May
be repeated as ART 332. Alternate years. Prerequisite: any 100-level studio art course. No S/U
option. [SA] (Fine Arts)

238. Papermaking
This studio course introduces sculpture, installation, and bookmaking using handmade and
found paper. Students make Japanese, Nepalese, and European style papers and review the
work of current artists manipulating paper to express ideas. No S/U option. [SA] (Fine Arts)

242. Painting
An introduction to the use of acrylic paint as a fine art medium. Observational, abstract, and
non-objective approaches will be explored. Prerequisite: any 100-level studio art course. No S/U
option. [SA] (Fine Arts)

251. Greek and Hellenistic Art
A review of the ancient art of the Mediterranean provides a foundation for an examination of the
arts of ancient Greece from the Archaic to the Hellenistic periods. Offered every third year.
Elective for Classical Studies majors. No S/U option. [AH] (Humanities)

252. Etruscan and Roman Art
Hellenistic era through the end of the Roman Empire, including the visual arts from the
Etruscan peoples to the early Christians. Offered every third year. Elective for Classical Studies
majors. No S/U option. [AH] (Humanities)

256. Italian Renaissance Art
The visual arts of Italy from the late medieval period through the end of the sixteenth century.

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