Page 190 - Catalogue 2015-2016
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511. Extended Research in Psychology (1/4)
Reading in depth on a topic of current interest and the pursuit of an empirical problem related
to the topic. Must be taken over four consecutive terms. Maximum number of credits allowed:
same as for PSY 485. (CR)

512. Reading and Conversation in Psychology (1/4)
Weekly discussion of articles and topics of interest in psychology. Three meetings per term for
four terms, with one or two hours of outside reading in preparation for each discussion.
Prerequisite: one college-level course in Psychology. (CR)

Religion (REL)

Michelle Petersen, Steven Sacks (chair)

Major: A minimum of nine courses, to include the following:
1. REL 101 and 222;
2. A minimum of one Bible course, chosen from the following: REL 243, 244, 251, or 252;
3. Either PHI 203 (Logic and Critical Thinking) or 355 (Philosophy of Religion);
4. Capstone course: REL 388; and
5. A minimum of four additional Religion courses, chosen such that both of the following

    criteria are met: (a) all four courses may not come from a single religious tradition, and (b)
    at least three of the four must be at the 300 level. Up to two of the following courses, each
    with substantial religion-related content, may be included in the nine courses required for
    the major: ANT 210 (Religion, Magic, and Witchcraft), 308 (Ritual, Symbol, and Behavior);
    ART 265 (Ritual Arts of the African Diaspora), 361 (Saints and She-Devils); CLA 216
    (Classical Mythology); ENG 326 (Milton); PHI 301 (Asian Philosophy), 355 (Philosophy of

    Religion); and SOC 370 (Religion, Spirituality, and Community).

Minor: A minimum of five courses in Religion, to include the following:
1. REL 222; and
2. A minimum of four additional Religion courses, chosen such that both of the following

    criteria are met: (a) all four courses may not come from a single religious tradition, and (b)

    at least three of the four must be at the 300 level.

101. Introduction to Religion
Our course will provide a comprehensive introduction to the study of religion in a college
setting. We will examine a variety of topics that inform our understanding of the meaning and
place of religion, including sacred place, space, action and time, the relationship of religion to

reason, and comparison of practices and beliefs across religious traditions. (Humanities)

125. Topics in Religion
Topics vary according to specialization or interest of instructor. See Topics Courses.

222. Religions of the World
Comparative survey of the major world religions, including Hinduism, Buddhism,
Confucianism, Taoism, Zoroastrianism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Systematic attention
to historical interrelations among traditions as well as differences in worldview and the
significance of these differences for understanding human nature and culture. (Humanities)

243. Origins of Israel                                                                      190
Introduction to the historical development and character of Israelite religion through its

Cornell College 2016-17 Academic Catalogue
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