Page 139 - Catalogue 2015-2016
P. 139

104. Modern Europe and Its Critics
Social and intellectual development of Europe since 1700. Not open to seniors without
permission of the instructor. No S/U option. (Humanities)

111-120. Introductory Seminars in History
Reading of both primary and secondary sources as the basis for class discussion and papers. See
Topics Courses. Not open to seniors without permission of the instructor. (Humanities)

141. Latin American History
Introduction to Latin American studies, with special attention to major themes and selected
countries. Same course as LAS 141. Not open to seniors without permission of the instructor. No

S/U option. (Humanities)

153. Origins of the American Nation
From colonial origins through Reconstruction, with emphasis on the formation of local,
sectional, and national communities. Not open to seniors without permission of the instructor.

No S/U option. (Humanities)

154. Making of Modern America
The late nineteenth century ushered in a plethora of momentous changes in the economic,
political, and social spheres of American life that heralded the birth of modern society. Massive
upheavals brought about by revolutions in American industry, transportation systems,
immigration patterns, and urbanization fundamentally altered the very structure of American
society. This course examines the underlying changes that gave rise to a new era in American
history epitomized by the "mass" character of modern life by focusing on mass production, mass
consumption, mass culture, and mass movements (including civil rights and women's rights)
from the mid-nineteenth century through the late 1960s. Not open to seniors without

permission of the instructor. No S/U option. (Humanities)

210. Warfare and Society in Modern Times
Changes in military conflict from the eighteenth century to the present. Interaction of warfare
and social values. No S/U option. (Humanities)

220. History of Spain, 700-1600
This course examines Spanish history from the Arab invasion through its “Golden Age.” The two
major themes that this course explores are 1) the shift from a frontier society to a colonial
empire, and 2) the multi-religious, multi-cultural nature of Iberian society during this period.
The course examines the dynamics of violence, competition, and coexistence, between Muslims,
Christians, and Jews, as well as within Muslim and Christian society. How did those dynamics,
and the ideology of Reconquest, shape Spanish society and Spain’s early colonial efforts? How
has this period of Spanish history been remembered and interpreted? (Humanities)

221. Trials and Transitions of the Renaissance
This course explores the political, social, and religious changes of the Renaissance period
(roughly, 1400-1600) through immersive simulations in which students adopt the personas of
historical individuals. Topics may include Florentine politics, the Reformation Parliament called

by Henry VIII, and others. (Humanities)

240. Public Memory and Public History
The American public has an insatiable appetite for representations of the nation's past, as

Cornell College 2016-17 Academic Catalogue                                                   139
   134   135   136   137   138   139   140   141   142   143   144