2014-2015 Supplement

This catalogue supplement applies to the 2014-2015 academic year and lists all permanent changes to the curriculum made since the publication of the 2013-14 Catalogue.

Updated February 22, 2014


Major Changes

  • French

    • Major: A minimum of eight course credits in French at or above the 300 level, which include FRE 301, 303, 311 or 312, and 411 or 412. A maximum of two elective upper-level courses in other areas, approved beforehand by the Department as relevant to the major, may be substituted for two of the elective French courses.
    • Minor: A minimum of five course credits in French at or above the 300 level, which include FRE 301, 303, and 311 or 312.
  • Women's Studies
    • Program is now titled Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies.
    • Course numbering system has changed from "WST" prefix to "GSS" prefix.
    • Major:
      • Requires 9.5 course credits (previously required 9), including GSS 171, GSS 270, GSS 5XX (taken two times in an academic year in subsequent semesters), and 487; and 6 course credits from GSS courses and departmental courses approved for GSS credit.
      • Also requires an experiential learning component.
      • Departmental courses must be taken from at least two divisions, and at least three must be at the 300 level.
      • WST 271, PHI 352, and WST 411 are no longer required.
    • Minor:
      • Requires 5.5 course credits (previously required 5), including GSS 171, GSS 270, and GSS 5XX (taken two times in an academic year in subsequent semesters); and 3 additional courses selected from GSS courses or departmental courses approved for GSS credit.
      • Two of the three additional courses may not be counted toward a major in another department or program.
      • At least two courses must be at the 300 level.
      • WST 271 or PHI 352 are not required.

Course Changes

  • CSC 255 and STA 257 [cross-listed] now satisfy the Interdisciplinary Thinking general education requirement.
  • EST 123 now satisfies the Interdisplinary Thinking general education requirement.
  • FRE 315 is no longer offered.
  • FRE 341 is no longer offered.
  • FRE 342 is no longer offered.
  • FRE 351 is no longer offered.
  • FRE 352 is no longer offered.
  • MUS 370 Special Topic: Tradition and Innovation will be offered 2014-15 and will satisfy the Interdisciplinary Thinking general education requirement.
  • PHY 123 is capped at 16 students.
  • PHY 141 now includes a lab and is capped at 28 students.
  • PHY 142 now includes a lab and is capped at 28 students.
  • PHY 512 is no longer offered.
  • PSY 372 is no longer offered.
  • THE 268 Scene Painting is now capped at 18 students.
  • THE 331 is now Advanced Acting: Meisner.
  • THE 343 is no longer offered.
  • THE 344 is no longer offered.
  • THE 345 is no longer offered.
  • THE 376 - 379 Topics Courses are no longer offered.
  • WST 411 is no longer offered.

Changes in Course Numbering:

  • ENG 367 is now ENG 267.
  • FRE 366 is now FRE 312.
  • PSY 265 is now PSY 244.
  • WST 171 is now GSS 171.

Canceled Courses:

  • REL 363 Suffering and the Sacred

New and Added Courses:

  • ART 268 Pre-Columbian Mexico through its Art and Architecture
  • ART 364 Rome Reborn: Caput Mundi in Ancient, Renaissance, and Modern Contexts
  • CSC 255 and STA 257 Dealing with Data: Data Manipulation, Data Visualization and Big Data [cross-listed]
  • FRE 312 Introduction to French and Francophone Film
  • FRE 365 Race and Immigration in French Film
  • GSS 270 Social Justice Perspectives and Practices
  • HIS 335 Persecution, Tolerance, and Minorities in Medieval Europe
  • PSY 244 Human Aggression and Violence
  • PSY 256 Psychological Insights into Environmental Problems
  • PSY 374 Social Neuroscience


Additions to the Catalogue

The old Praxis I information under Education has changes as follows:

Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educators

Successful completion of the Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educators is required for all Cornell students seeking admission to the Teacher Education Program. These computer given tests determine college-level competence in the areas of reading, writing, and mathematics. It is strongly recommended that students register to take the Praxis tests during the spring of their freshman year or the fall of their sophomore year. These exams are given by Educational Testing Service (at Iowa City and numerous other nationwide locations) during August, September, November, January, March, April, and June of each year. The department recommends that students take the exam no later than November of their sophomore year. Registration for the Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educators exam is due one month in advance and score reports are available 4-6 weeks after the tests are taken. Specific dates for each academic year are posted early in the Registration Bulletin and sample questions are available at the Education Office in Room 103 of College Hall. The registration fee is approximately $170.00 and is the responsibility of the student. The cut scores for each section of the Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educators Exam are: 156 on the reading section, 150 on the mathematics section, and 162 on the writing section.



Course Information:

ART

ART 268 Pre-Columbian Mexico through its Art and Architecture. This class will explore, through the selection of a limited number of works of art and architecture, the rich artistic traditions of pre-Columbian Mexico. Although the course’s geographical and historical reach is large (spanning over 3,000 years of history and a broad swath of North America), the works that we will examine are selective rather than comprehensive, and certain recurring themes will be emphasized in class discussions.  Such themes include: Mesoamerican rulership and its representation; various cultures’ approaches to life and death and how they are reflected in art and material culture; Mesoamerican cities and urban planning; materials and “material meanings”; uses of technology in understanding the pre-Columbian world; collecting the pre-Columbian past; and continuities of pre-Columbian culture after 1521.  Class discussions, one field trip, and assigned readings are intended to help students in the critical evaluation of this art. Class sessions will be a mixture of illustrated lectures and discussion. No S/U option. (Humanities) [AH] HOOBLER 

ART 353 Advanced Topic: Utilitarian Ceramics. Studio course centered on site-specific, three dimensional art created to investigate space. Students will utilize a variety of materials. Prerequisite: Any 200 level studio art course or ART 311 or 312. (Fine Arts) BIONDO GEMMELL

ART 364 Rome Reborn: Caput Mundi in Ancient, Renaissance, and Modern Contexts (Taught in Italy). This course, traces the evolving nature of the Eternal City from antiquity and the world of Julius Caesar and Augustus to the Rome of the early modern popes and the imperialism revived under Fascism and Benito Mussolini.  Topics include the evolution of the ancient city into the capital of the Roman Empire, the Christianization of Rome and the ChurchTriumphant of the Counter Reformation and urban planning under Mussolini.  We will visit many of the most important sites and museums in Rome such the Forum, the Colosseum, and the Pantheon, Saint Peter's, Bramante's Tempietto, the Villa Borghese and the Trevi Fountain along with the Ara Pacis and the EUR (Esposizione Universale Roma) as envisioned in the twentieth century.  This course is particularly appropriate for students interested in architecture and urban planning as a reflection of persuasive or visual rhetoric. Prerequisites: junior/senior standing or completion of a 200-level art history course. No S/U option. (Humanties) PENN-GOETSCH

BIOLOGY

BIO 283 Topic: Case Studies in Tropical Wildlife Conservation (in Costa Rica). This course will focus on experiential learning with a few wildlife conservation projects at different locations in Costa Rica. In addition to hands-on experience with a diversity of animal species, we will also study the biology of the focal species and discuss primary literature related to the projects we work on and observe. We will also explore the interactions of local residents, tourists, and conservation practitioners with species of conservation interest. Our focus will be on what conservation looks like on the ground, whether by governmental agencies, non-governmental organizations, businesses, or private landowners, and on what approaches seem to be succeeding or failing. We will visit several sites with ongoing conservation projects, participate in these projects, and compare and contrast the sometimes strikingly different approaches taken to conservation. This course will be offered in Costa Rica. Prerequisites: ENV 101 or BIO 142 and permission of instructor. This course satisfies the Animal Biology requirement for the Biology major. (Laboratory Science) McCOLLUM

CHEMISTRY

CHE 108 Topic:  Forensic Science:  Real Life CSI.  Introductory course intended for non‑science majors.  Scientific principles as applied to the analysis of physical evidence and crime scenes.  The course will focus on what and how scientists can learn from evidence. There will be an emphasis on chemistry and chemical instrumentation but we will also discuss the interdisciplinary nature of forensic science. In addition, the portrayal of forensic science and forensic scientists in the media and popular culture will be examined. Possibility of one or more field trips. (Science) TEAGUE

COMPUTER SCIENCE

CSC 255 Dealing with Data: Data Management, Data Visualization, and Big Data. Managing and interpreting an overwhelming amount of raw data is part of the foundation of our information society and economy. People use computers and statistics to translate, process, and visualize raw data, enabling new understandings that in turn contribute new knowledge to the world.  This course will look at these topics from both a statistical and a computer science perspective.  Statistics will inform the discussion about what appropriate goals are for learning from the data and how the data will answer the questions raised.  The computer science perspective will help us figure out which goals are actually feasible computationally, and how to achieve them. [Cross-listed with STA 257] SOWELL (Interdisciplinary)

EDUCATION

EDU 262 Comparative Education in Belize. This course is an off-campus course that allows students to teach in local schools on the island of San Pedro in the country of Belize. Interdisciplinary in nature, the course includes sociological, anthropological and historical study of the Belizean people, their school system and their culture.  Students gain familiarity with Hispanic, Creole, Mayan, Garifuna and Mestizzo cultures and complete a qualitative and ethnographic research project born of their off-campus experience. Field trips include an architectural tour of the Lamanai Mayan Pyramids, a day sail and snorkeling trip to the Hol Chan Marine Reserve and Shark Ray Alley, and Cave Tubing and Ziplining on the mainland. HEINRICH (Social Science)

EDU 265 Educational Policy and Practice. This course will explore the nature of school resegregation, the rise of credentialism, the end of educational expansion, and the continuation of inequality of educational opportunity. Each of these phenomena have powerful implications for education policy. Students in the course will be introduced to the history of policymaking in education beginning with the education reform policies of Horace Mann. Students will also examine demographic data on educational attainment, analyze the policies that attempt to alleviate (or reproduce) educational inequality, and describe what assumptions lie behind current reform ideas. We will evaluate the dynamics of current debates by referencing the long-standing tensions among the different purposes of schooling we have in our nation. Finally, students will have the opportunity to examine educational practices from other countries and even other fields (such as business and medicine) to stimulate creative thinking about reform and policy. (Social Science) (KAUPER)

ENGLISH

ENG 273 Bahamian Literature. This course offers the unique experience of studying the literature of the Bahamas in the Bahamas. We will study how Bahamian literature has been conceived since national independence in 1973: what makes someone a Bahamian writer? what do writers from the Bahamas have in common with one another? how does Bahamian literature reflect the environment it arises from and how does it help forge a new national identity? We will study the cultural work of literary anthologies in establishing a collective identity and sense of place; we will also investigate what’s missing from such anthologies. Our time on the island of San Salvador will help us flesh out the connections between literature and the environment, and we will do our own writing to further explore how the environment of the Bahamas influences writers. Our final project will be to create a new anthology of Bahamian literature that reflects the knowledge we’ve gained about the place and its people – and includes some of our own writing as well. This course is an opportunity for students who are: literature enthusiasts, creative writers, interested in Environmental Studies, inspired by new landscapes and historical sites. Pre-requisites: FYW and permission of instructor. ENTEL (Humanities) (FEE)

FRENCH

FRE 312  Introduction to French and Francophone Film. This course will introduce students to the study of French-language film.  They will learn about important periods, movements, and directors in French and Francophone filmmaking from the beginning in 1895 with the Lumière brothers to the present, possibly including la Nouvelle Vague (films such as A Bout de souffle and Les Quatre Cent Coups), banlieue cinema (films that focus on or are made by people living in the housing projects surrounding major French cities), and films by Ousmane Sembène (a Senegalese author and director considered by some to be the ‘father of African cinema’).  Students will develop the critical vocabulary and skills necessary to analyze films as constructed texts and will become familiar with the socio-historical contexts in which the films were produced.  The course will be conducted in French.  Prerequisite:  FRE 301.  Alternate years.  (Humanities)  WINES or BATY

FRE 365 Race and Immigration in French-language Film. Issues surrounding race and immigration are the focus of much attention in the United States, and such issues are similarly important topics of discussion in France.  However, the French context of race and immigration is quite different from its American counterpart, and this means that related questions are differently defined, constructed, and understood.  France’s long colonial history plays no small part in generating and continuing conversations on the matters of race and immigration, and its policy of assimilation vis à vis immigrants and the colonized has frequently resulted in debate, protest, and legislation. We will examine constructions of race and portrayals of immigration in French-language films primarily from France.  Special attention will be paid to intersections of class and gender with race and immigration.  Readings will be provided to buttress understanding of the historical and social contexts as well as to contribute to comprehension of some critical race theory.  Prerequisite:  FRE 311 or 312. Offered every third year. Humanities) WINES

FRE 366 Introduction to Classical French Theatre in Translation. Plays from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries in France, a period sometimes referred to as the golden age of French theatre, continue to both influence drama and be performed throughout the world today. In this course, we will study a selection of comedies, tragedies, and other theatrical texts from the era by authors such as Corneille, Moliere, and Racine, situating them in their socio-historical and intellectual milieux. Since plays are intended to be performed and watched rather than read, in addition to examining texts we will watch adaptations and there will be occasions for students to engage with the texts on their feet. Finally, we will discuss the role that these plays had as vehicles of important philosophical and moral ideas circulating in France early in the modern age. This course will be taught in English. French majors may count this course as one of their electives towards the major. Pre-requisite: Writing Requirement. WINES

GENDER, SEXUALITY, and WOMEN'S STUDIES

GSS 171 Gender, Power, and Identity. This interdisciplinary core course in the program analyzes how notions of race, gender, sexuality, class, nation, physical ability and other aspects of social location materially influence people’s lives. To conduct our analysis, we will consider various strands of feminism, divergent positions among queer theorists, and arguments drawn from other identity based fields (e.g ethnic studies, American studies, postcolonial studies) in order to survey and compare several perspectives on gender, race, sexuality, race and class. Placing gender and sexuality at the center of analysis, we will address some of the basic concepts in Gender, Sexualities and Women’s Studies. We will also explore questions regarding incorporating other social categories such as race, ethnicity, class and nationality. Throughout the course we will complete readings, watch films, and engage in exercises to explore the past, present and potential future understandings about gender and sexuality, paying close attention to political, cultural, and economic contexts. THOMAS

GSS 270 Social Justice Perspectives and Practices. Intersectional and interdisciplinary exploration of feminist and other social justice perspectives and practices relevant to understanding and responding to social oppression.  Course discussions focus on power, privilege, oppression, and implications for social change.  Activities and assignments focus on using social justice remedies or ‘tools,’ such as individual resistance, policy, advocacy, and social action, and collective struggle to propose solutions to contemporary problems.  Areas studied might include critical race theory and critical race feminism, queer theory, women of color feminisms, transnational/global feminisms, disability studies, liberation theory, postcolonial theory, feminist ‘locational’ theories. Specific topics vary by instructor. (Interdisciplinary)

GERMAN

German 116 Holocaust. This introductory cultural studies course will explore the historical narratives of, cultural responses to, and the ethical dilemmas of the Nazi Holocaust. Taught in English. SCHUSTER-CRAIG

German 317 Life under Dictatorship. This course explores the literature, film, drama and art created by citizens of the German Democratic Republic (East Germany) between 1945-1989. We will explore a variety of representations of daily life in order to understand how socialism influenced not just cultural production, but also institutional structures, family life and narratives of the nation. Taught in German. (Humanities)

German 351 Modern Men. The three authors most associated with modernist literature are Rainer Maria Rilke, Thomas Mann and Franz Kafka. This course will explore their writings, position within the literary industry, and the place of literature in society in the early 20th century. Taught in English. Humanities. Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing. SCHUSTER-CRAIG (Humanities)

HISTORY

HIS 335 Persecution, Tolerance, and Minorities in the Middle Ages. This course explores the marginalization and persecution of minority groups in medieval Europe, as well as the coexistence of minority and majority. Why was persecution a common reaction to minority groups, set apart by their religion, sexuality, or health, in medieval Europe? Can coexistence be described as tolerance?  What laws and customs shaped interactions between majority and minorities? This course examines these questions through reading primary sources from the European Middle Ages in translation and diverse theoretical and methodological perspectives on the study of marginalized groups. HERDER (Humanities)

 

HIS 262 Trials and Transitions of the Renaissance. In this course, explore the past by taking on the role of a historical decision-maker. We’ll explore these complex and dramatic times through participation-intensive historical simulations, in which the students take the lead. As a class, you'll shape the direction of the English Reformation during the reign of Henry VIII. Reading, writing, speaking, and class participation are all essential. HERDER (Humanities)

 

HIS 333 Saints and Rebels: Medieval Monasticism. This course examines the ideal and reality of the Christian monastic life in Europe until the start of the Protestant Reformation. It will explore the spiritual values inspiring monks and nuns—the desire to retreat from the world and the quest for spiritual fulfilment through self-discipline. These high ideals bred their share of discontents, and we’ll explore issues of disorder and rebellion within the monastery. We will also deal with the tension between those ideals and the wealth and power that monasteries acquired in medieval Europe, examining reformers and critics of monastic institutions from Bernard of Clairvaux to Martin Luther. HERDER (Humanities)


HIS 258-8 History of Spain, 700-1600. This course examines Spanish history from the Arab invasion through its “Golden Age.” A central issue will be the dynamic between Muslims and Christians in Iberia, including violence, competition, and coexistence. How those interactions, and the ideology of Reconquest, shaped Spanish society and Spain’s early colonial efforts will be key questions in the course. HERDER (Humanities)

MATHEMATICS and STATISTICS

STA 257 Dealing with Data: Data Management, Data Visualization, and Big Data. Managing and interpreting an overwhelming amount of raw data is part of the foundation of our information society and economy. People use computers and statistics to translate, process, and visualize raw data, enabling new understandings that in turn contribute new knowledge to the world.  This course will look at these topics from both a statistical and a computer science perspective.  Statistics will inform the discussion about what appropriate goals are for learning from the data and how the data will answer the questions raised.  The computer science perspective will help us figure out which goals are actually feasible computationally, and how to achieve them. [Cross-listed with CSC 255] CANNON (Interdisciplinary)

MUSIC

MUS 370 Special Topic: Tradition and Innovation. An interdisciplinary course that explores the relationship between tradition and innovation.  The course approaches this question through the study of myth, drama, music/opera, literature, criticism, and essays, from antiquity through the 20th century.  Major topics/texts are: 1) Interpretations of the Electra myth: The Libation Bearers of Aeschylus, the Electra of Sophocles, and Richard Strauss’ Elektra; 2) The role of traditions and historical antecedents in Wagner’s “artwork of the future,” Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg, and his major essay The Artwork of the Future; and, 3)  James Joyce’s Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, wherein our protagonist fights the suffocation he feels from Catholicism, Irish traditions, and language while trying to become an artist.  Each of these topics has strong connections with at least one other topic in the course. MARTIN (Interdisciplinary)

PSYCHOLOGY

PSY 265 Psychology and the Holocaust. This course will examine psychological perspectives on the Holocaust through travel and study in Eastern Europe.  The course itinerary will include Jewish communities and cities that were affected by the Holocaust (Vienna, Prague, Budapest, and Krakow), death/concentration camps and museums that are relevant to the Holocaust, various cultural and historical sites within these Eastern European settings, and locations/museums that are relevant to the practice of psychology. The historical, cultural, and sociocultural context of the Holocaust and psychology’s roots in Eastern Europe (especially Vienna) will receive attention as will events and cultural changes that followed World War II.  The course will also explore the work of important contributors to early psychological practice (e.g., Sigmund Freud, Alfred Adler, Victor Frankl) as well as how these early leaders responded to Nazi era developments.   Readings will include literature, personal narratives, psychological sources relevant to the Holocaust, social psychology readings on genocide, and the works of personality theorists of Vienna. (Social Science) ENNS

RELIGION

REL 367 Advanced Topic: Jewish Mysticism. This course will provide an introduction to major historical, ritual and theological concepts of Jewish mysticism. Within the context of a single course, we will introduce a breadth of knowledge that will allow the student to attain fluency in the language of Jewish mysticism, and provide a depth of elucidations of mythic and mystic self-understandings, as they relate to Judaism as a tradition. Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing. SACKS (Humanities) 

REL 369 Advanced Topic: Gods and Goddesses of Norse Mythology. This course will explore the stories of the gods and goddesses of the Norse pantheon, as recorded in the Icelandic eddas and sagas. Included will be an analysis of creation myths, the exploits of Odin and Thor, and the eventual demise of the gods at the hands of giants. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. MOLLEUR (Humanities) 

SOCIOLOGY

SOC 358 Sociology of the Environment. The course will explore the interactions of human social systems with ecosystems, considering the ways in which people, other animals, and plants, land, water, and air are closely interconnected. It will investigate how human consumption and production, along with technology, population, and health are interwoven with environmental conditions. It will also study how the cultures, ideas, moral values, and social experiences of different human groups, from modern Americans to indigenous populations, influence the way people think about and act toward the environment. Finally, it will contemplate a number of ways in which people might act, both individually and collectively, to bring about a more ecological society. Prerequisite: SOC 101. [Institutions] OLSON (Social Science)

THEATRE

THE 260 Puppetry Design. An introduction to the design and build process for puppetry.  The course will explore various materials used in design and construction with a focus on Tabletop and Bunraku puppetry styles.  Students will learn build techniques while designing and creating puppet characters for performance. Prerequisite: THE 107 or 108. (Fine Arts)

THE 261 Puppetry Performance. An introduction to puppetry in theatrical performance. Students will explore the puppeteer’s exploration of narrative, aesthetics, and kinetics to create character, scene and story. Areas to be covered include:  improvisation and devised theatre techniques, Bunraku and Tabletop puppet manipulation, and integration of sound and breath.

Prerequisite: THE 115. (Fine Arts)

THE 346 Theatre and Society I. This course will examine the history and dramatic literature of theatre spanning the ancient through the early modern era. Students will examine major dramatic forms and develop an understanding of the underlying cultural, socio/political shifts and economic changes that informed the theatrical movement. Questions regarding the use of theatre to support or subvert cultural norms will serve as a thread throughout the course. Students will investigate the development of performances spaces as well as the various performance techniques, audiences, aesthetics and scenic methods of the era. Prerequisite: THE 201 Play Analysis and writing-designated course. (Humanities)

THE 347 Theatre and Society II. This course will examine the history and dramatic literature of theatre in the modern and contemporary era. Students will examine major dramatic forms and develop an understanding of the underlying cultural, socio/political shifts and economic changes that informed the theatrical movement. Questions regarding the use of theatre to support or subvert cultural norms will serve as a thread throughout the course. Students will investigate the development of performances spaces as well as the various performance techniques, audiences, aesthetics and scenic methods of the era. Prerequisite: THE 201 Play Analysis and writing-designated course. (Humanities)