General

111. Introduction to Politics
Although you may not realize it, every one of us is involved in politics on a daily basis. We each have experienced parents and children haggling over the rules governing curfew or use of the car, employees and bosses negotiating behaviors at work, and organized crime families disputing turf wars (ok, maybe not that last one). Yet, in one way or another, politics is a part of our lives regardless of whether we are interested in Congress, political parties, or international negotiations. Politics is the process by which individuals and groups reach agreements on a course of joint action--even if they disagree on the intended goals of that action.  This class discusses the problems that groups need to overcome to reach agreements on a joint course of action, and looks at the political institutions and other political processes and incentives that enable groups to overcome those barriers here in the United States and internationally. (Social Science) HASSELL

250. Principles of Advocacy
An overview of the United States legal system with an emphasis on the adversarial approach to resolution of conflicts and controversies in federal, state, and local tribunals as well as in alternate forums and venues. Students will gain a general understanding of the roles of the various participants with primary focus on the role of the lawyer as advocate. The course will incorporate aspirational and ethical considerations, practical issues faced by trial attorneys, and the potential for fulfillment and disillusionment fighting the battles of others. (Social Science)

251-255. Topics in Politics
Study of a selected topic in politics. See Topics Courses. (Social Science)

280/380. Political Affairs Internship
Field experience in applied politics. Prerequisites: acceptance by a sponsoring agency or individual and approval of a formal prospectus by the faculty sponsor. See Additional Academic Programs, All-College Independent Study Courses 280/380. (CR)

290/390. Individual Project: See Additional Academic Programs, All-College Independent Study Courses 290/390.

299/399. Summer Internship in Political Science
Field experience in applied politics. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, acceptance by a sponsoring agency or individual, and approval of a formal prospectus by the faculty sponsor. May be repeated once for credit. See Courses 299/399. (CR)

348. U.S. Foreign Policy
Process by which U.S. foreign policy is made and implemented, focusing on contemporary cases. Emphasis on how the political process and distribution of authority affect policy. Prerequisite: POL 242. (Social Science) YAMANISHI

351-354. Advanced Topics in Politics
Study of a selected topic in politics. See Topics Courses. (Social Science)

483. Research Seminar
Each student will choose a topic within politics to explore through group discussion and peer review, presentations, and a paper that critically reviews existing research to advance an argument. Prerequisites: Politics major with junior standing and three 300-level Politics classes other than internships. No S/U option. (Social Science) HASSELL

511. Readings in Politics and Public Policy (1/4)
Weekly reading and discussion on a topic of interest in Politics and Public Policy around a general theme.  Three meetings per term for four terms, with one or two hours of outside reading in preparation for each discussion.  May be repeated for credit to a maximum in both Pol 511 and POL 512 of two course credits. (CR)

512. Extended Research in Politics and Public Policy (1/4)
The pursuit of an empirical problem through experimental or other research, including research design, implementation, and write-up and dissemination of results.  May be repeated for credit to a maximum in both POL 511, and POL 512 of two course credits. (CR)

Political Thought

222. Foundations of the First Amendment
Political thought from political practice to political philosophy. Recent U.S. Supreme Court rulings on the freedom of expression, the Constitutional background for the Court's ruling, and the arguments for freedom of expression. Readings include Mill's On Liberty, Supreme Course cases, works on current legal controversies, and John Milton. (Social Science) SUTHERLAND

225. Ethics and Public Policy
Contemporary studies in the standards that apply to political leaders and how they are explained, interpreted, and enforced. When taught off campus, registration entails additional expense. (Social Science) SUTHERLAND

315-319. Seminar in Political Thought
Examination of a particular topic or issue in political thought. Content varies from year to year. Prerequisite: POL 222 or 225. Offered subject to availability of faculty. (Social Science)

325. Anglo-American Constitutional Thought
Richard Hooker, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, Benjamin Franklin, and other Americans considered as guides to the much admired and imitated American experiment in writing a constitution. Prerequisite: POL 222 or 225. (Social Science)

327. Revolutionary Political Thought
Modern writings for and against revolution, including Marx's Manifesto, Burke's Reflections, and Hardt/Negri's Multitude. Alternate years. Prerequisite: POL 222 or 225 or permission of the instructor. (Social Science)  SUTHERLAND

International Relations and Comparative Government

242. International Politics
How and why states compete and cooperate internationally. Addresses concepts such as the balance of power between states, collective security through treaties and international organizations, nuclear deterrence, and the growing influence of non-Western states. Typically includes historical and current case studies. (Social Science) YAMANISHI  

243. Comparative Politics
Various types of political systems, including liberal democracies, current and former communist systems, and mixed systems of the developing world. (Social Science) THOMAS

330. Women and Politics: A Cross-National Perspective
This course examines a variety of issues and debates within the field of Political Science that are particularly relevant to the study of women and politics. The course will examine women's participation in formal politics in a comparative perspective, by focusing on women's roles as voters, candidates, and officeholders. Course materials include case studies from various countries. Prerequisite: POL 243. Alternate years. (Social Science)

331. Gender and Development
This course will critically investigate the complex ways in which gender relationships shape history, ideology, economy, and polity in developing countries. The role and status of Asian women will be examined to enable students to compare and contrast non-Western experiences with Western experiences. The forces of modernity and the impact on colonialism will also be discussed especially in relation to the economic and political conditions of the non-Western world and development. Prerequisite: POL 243. Alternate years. (Social Science) THOMAS

332. Human Rights
Practices and characteristics of governments and non-governmental actors that abuse and protect human rights, history of the concept and treatment of rights, justifications for the protection of rights, differences between categories of rights, prospects for the improved protection of rights through international and domestic action. Prerequisite: junior standing. Alternate years. (Interdisciplinary)  YAMANISHI

333. International Organizations
History, present characteristics, and future prospects of efforts to establish international order through global and regional integration and governance, the development of international law, the activity of internationally-oriented non-state actors and social movements, and resistance thereto. Prerequisite: POL 242. Alternate years. (Social Science)

334. Strategies to Alleviate Poverty
The course explores the nature of poverty in the developing world. What causes it? What behaviors does it induce? Emphasis is on discussing various institutional factors that lead to poverty. The course will explore strategies and programs designed to alleviate poverty at the international, national and local levels, and analyze the role of the World Bank, national governments and non-governmental organizations in eliminating poverty. Can poverty be eradicated and if so, can the solution be found in capitalism itself? If not, is there a viable alternative? Prerequisite: POL 242 or 243. Alternate years. (Social Science) THOMAS

335-339. Seminar in International Relations and Comparative Government
Examination of a particular topic or issue in international relations or in comparative government. Content varies from year to year. Prerequisite: POL 242 or 243. Offered subject to availability of faculty. (Social Science)

341. Latin American Politics
History, present characteristics, and future prospects of political systems in Central America, South America, and the Caribbean. Addresses decolonization, authoritarianism, democratization, human rights, the political effects of social institutions and economic crises, and foreign relations with the US and other powers. Prerequisite: POL 243, LAS 141, or HIS 141. Alternate years. (Social Science)

346. Political Economy of Developing Countries
Political-economic systems of selected developing countries of Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Discussions of independence movements, post-independence experiences of civilian rule, civil-military relations, and the evolving relationships between politics and economics in these countries. Prerequisite: POL 243. Alternate years. (Social Science)

348. U.S. Foreign Policy
Process by which U.S. foreign policy is made and implemented, focusing on contemporary cases. Emphasis on how the political process and distribution of authority affect policy. Prerequisite: POL 242. (Social Science)

349. International Political Economy
This class uses methods and theorems central to international economics in the areas of trade and money (such as comparative advantage, factor and sector models, partial and general equilibrium, the Heckscher-Ohlin model, imperfect competition, import-substitution vs. export-orientation, strategic trade theory, balance of payments, aggregate demand, the Stolper-Samuelson theorem, and other concepts, methods, and theorems) to sustain an economically informed discussion of the political constraints upon and political implications of international exchange of goods and currencies. I have often noted that the class covers a large part of the same economic material as ECB 223 (International Economics), though we constantly direct our attention to the questions of what political constraints preclude or modify the outcomes economists expect and how economic developments favor and constrain the desires of domestic political actors. The class also has a substantial focus upon the political constraints upon economic development, that highlights the very important interactions between these economic and political science concepts in a particular policy area that is often of interest to students. Thus, the focus of the class is upon questions that are of interest to both economists and political scientists, and my hope is that our attention to the interaction between economics and politics – each viewed through the disciplinary lenses best adapted to understanding them – will help my students understand the value of using multiple disciplinary approaches to approach problems. Prerequisites: POL 242 and ECB 101. Alternate years. (Interdisciplinary Thinking) YAMANISHI

American Politics and Public Policy

250. Principles of Advocacy
An overview of the United States legal system with an emphasis on the adversarial approach to resolution of conflicts and controversies in federal, state, and local tribunals as well as in alternate forums and venues. Students will gain a general understanding of the roles of the various participants with primary focus on the role of the lawyer as advocate. The course will incorporate aspirational and ethical considerations, practical issues faced by trial attorneys, and the potential for fulfillment and disillusionment fighting the battles of others. (Social Science)

262. American Politics
Survey of the theory and practice of constitutional government in the United States. (Social Science) HASSELL

282. Public Policy
Introduction to the policy-making process, to the basics of public policy analysis, and to the substance of selected policy debates.  (Social Science) CZASTKIEWICZ

355-359. Seminar in American Politics/Political Activism
Examination of a particular topic or issue in American politics. Content varies from year to year. Prerequisite: POL 262. Offered subject to availability of faculty. (Social Science)

361. Race, Sex, and the Constitution
Exploration of Constitutional principles including equal protection of the laws, privacy, and freedom of speech as they apply to issues of race, gender, and ethnicity: race and sex discrimination, equal opportunity, affirmative action, abortion, pornography, privacy rights, hate speech, political correctness, etc. Prerequisites: POL 262 and junior standing. Alternate years. (Social Science)  ALLIN

363. Campaigns and Elections
Electoral process in the U.S., including discussion of the numerous factors which contribute to or diminish the probability of electoral success. Prerequisite: POL 262.  Alternate years. (Social Science)  HASSELL

364. Congress and the Presidency
In-depth study of the central institutions of the American political system and the evolving relationship between them. Prerequisite: POL 262. Alternate years. (Social Science)

365. Constitutional Law: The American System
Structure and function of the American judicial system and its role in constitutional interpretation. The court's role in three great conflicts that have shaped the American experience: (1) nation vs. states–the struggle for sovereignty, (2) Congress vs. President–the struggle for supremacy over national policy, and (3) government vs. business–the struggle over government regulation of the economy. Prerequisites: POL 262 and junior standing. Alternate years. (Social Science)

366. Constitutional Law: Rights and Liberties
Rights of individuals in America. The court's role in three broad areas: (1) criminal prosecution, (2) free expression, and (3) race and sex discrimination. Prerequisites: POL 262 and junior standing. Alternate years.  (Social Science) ALLIN

367. Urban Politics and Policy
Government in urban America. Issues of public policy, and their consequences for city dwellers and the nation. Feasibility and desirability of various solutions. Prerequisite: POL 262 or 282. Alternate years. (Social Science)

368. Environmental Politics and Policy
Analysis of the policy process concerning energy and environmental issues, emphasizing the interrelated roles of Congress, federal and state agencies, the President, interest groups, etc., and including an evaluation of alternative policies. Prerequisite: POL 262 or 282. Alternate years. (Social Science)

371. Wilderness Politics and Policy
An exploration of governmental policies designed to preserve and manage wilderness areas in the United States. Taught at the Wilderness Field Station and in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area. Registration entails additional costs. Prerequisites: POL 262 or 282 and permission of the instructor. Alternate years. (Social Science)  ALLIN

372. Current Cases before the Supreme Court
Examination of selected cases to be heard by the Supreme Court through lecture, discussion, and oral argument. Case analysis by Judge Hansen and Professor Sutherland in the first half of the course; oral argument by students in the last half. Prerequisite: POL 262. (Social Science)

381. Education Policy in America: Dollars, Sticks, or Carrots?
This course will focus on analyzing contemporary education policy in the United States. We will explore the motivations, goals, and outcomes of major educational policies. Have they achieved what they intended to accomplish? Why or why not? We will also consider issues concerning the role of education in society, the presence and impact of inequality in education, and the role of the federal government in guiding education policy. Throughout the course we will return to an underlying question that permeates many of today’s education policy debates: What is the proper use of incentives, resources, and/or sanctions in maximizing student achievement, teacher quality, and social benefits from education? Prerequisite: POL 262 or 282. (Social Science)

382. Methods of Public Policy Analysis
Methods of public policy analysis emphasizing economic and quantitative tools for policy making and policy evaluation. Prerequisites: STA 201; POL 262 or 282; ECB 101 or 102. (Social Science) HASSELL

561. Mock Trial (1/4)
Participating in simulated trials in competition with teams from other institutions, learning legal practices, procedures and ethics and developing critical thinking and public speaking skills. (CR)

981. Washington Center: see Cornell-Approved Domestic Off-Campus Programs.

982. Capital Experience: see Cornell-Approved Domestic Off-Campus Programs.