101. Lifetime Physical Fitness and Activities
Instruction in the major components of fitness, the physiological basis of fitness, evaluation of personal fitness, and individual fitness programming. Instruction and participation in lifetime physical activities selected from badminton, bicycling, bowling, camping and canoeing, golf, hiking, racquetball, sailing, skiing, tennis, volleyball, and weight training.

111. Foundations of Kinesiology
Historical and philosophical foundation of physical education. Current issues in research and literature. Biological, physiological, and sociological aspects of sport and exercise. Not open to seniors without permission of instructor.

205. Coaching Endorsement or Authorization
Structure and function of the human body during physical activity. Knowledge and understanding of human growth and development of children in relation to physical activity. Athletic conditioning, theory of coaching interscholastic athletics, professional ethics, and legal responsibility. Combined with KIN 237, this course meets the requirement for an Iowa Coaching Endorsement for Education majors and Coaching Authorization for all other students.

206. Exercise Psychology
Examination of theory, current research, and applications of psychological processes and behaviors related to physical activity. Topics include psychological and emotional effects of exercise, motivation for fitness, factors in exercise avoidance, adoption, and adherence, exercise addiction, and cognitive and behavioral change strategies for exercise compliance, and consideration of gender, ethnicity, and special needs populations. Not open to seniors without permission of instructor. (Social Science)

207. Systems Physiology
Fundamental study of the complementarity of human anatomical structure and physiological function of the integumentary, endocrine, nervous, muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal systems. Special emphasis on development of a mechanistic understanding of organ system function and integrated physiological function across systems to promote homeostatic regulation in the human body. Inclusion of experiential learning through laboratory activities. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Cross Listed as BIO 207. (Laboratory Science)

212. Sports and American Society
Exploration of the impact of amateur and professional sports on the American way of life. Sample topics include women in sports, sports and the African-American community, sports as big business, and the relationship between sport and education. Readings reflecting a variety of viewpoints about the role of sports in American society will be selected from contemporary literature. (Social Science)

215. Psychology of Sport
Theory and issues related to psychological aspects of competitive sport contexts. Personality and sport, attentional control, anxiety and performance, motivation and attributions, aggression in sport, and team cohesion. Intervention strategies for performance enhancement. (Social Science)

220. Ancient Greek Athletics
Study of the origins and functions of competitive athletics in ancient Greece. Traditional athletic events are studied in detail and special emphasis is placed on the festivals at Olympia, Delphi, Nemea, Isthmia, and Athens. Reflections on athletics' connection to ancient Greek culture, arts, and religion. Alternate years.

237. Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries
Prevention and treatment of athletic injuries, taping experience, understanding the principles of athletic training, and first aid and emergency care.

255-259. Topics in Kinesiology
In-depth study of selected topics of current interest in the field of kinesiology. Offered subject to the availability of faculty. See Topics Courses.

290/390. Individual Project: See Additional Academic Programs, All-College Independent Study Courses 290/390.

308. Human Biomechanics
This course is an advanced study of mechanical principles, both kinetic and kinematic, as they apply to human motion.  Specific topics include various classes of anatomic levers and pulleys, torque, eccentric force, mechanical advantage, laws of motion as they apply to human movement, mechanical loading, linear and angular motion, effects of friction, equilibrium, the forces of gravity and reaction forces.  Inclusion of experiential learning through laboratory activities. Prerequisites: KIN 207, KIN 309.

309. Anatomy of Human Movement
Study of the anatomical and neuromuscular factors associated with human movement. Includes connective tissue and skeletal system physiology, identification of major musculoskeletal structures (bones and bony landmarks, origins and insertions for major muscles, muscle groups, major tendonous/ligamentous structures), joint movements and muscle actions. Practical application of anatomical and neuromuscular principles to human movement via a kinematic analysis of a motor skill. Prerequisite: KIN 207 or Instructor permission.

310. Nutrition for Health and Performance
In-depth study of the role of nutrition in health promotion and disease prevention. Topics include ingestional physiology, regulation of food intake and energy balance, biological roles of macro- and micro-nutrients, nutrient dietary reference intake values and food sources, eating disorders and the Female Athlete Triad, as well as nutritional strategies for athletes to promote exercise performance. Includes nutritional analyses. Prerequisite: KIN 207. Alternate years.

311. Methods for Individual Sports
Designed for those interested in teaching individual sports and lifetime activities in public schools and community recreational settings. Course emphasis on analysis of skills, and the development of teaching and assessment materials including use of computer technology. Use of class discussions, presentations, small group and peer teaching. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Alternate years.

315. Physiology of Exercise
In-depth study of the human responses to exercise and exercise training, including: substrate metabolism and energy production during exercise, cardiorespiratory and neuromuscular function during acute exercise, cardiovascular and neuromuscular adaptations to exercise training, endocrine responses to physical activity, and thermoregulation. Introduction to current scientific methodologies and the development of practical skills through experiential laboratory activities. Prerequisite: KIN 207 or Instructor permission.  

318. Methods for Team and Dual Sports
Designed for those interested in teaching team and dual sports in public schools and recreational settings. Course emphasis on analysis of skills, and the development of teaching and assessment materials including use of computer technology. Use of class discussions, presentations, small group and peer teaching. Prerequisites: Kinesiology major or minor and junior standing or permission of the instructor. Alternate years.

324. Elementary Physical Education Methods
Methods for teaching physical education to elementary school pupils. Rhythms, low and high organization games, elementary gymnastics, classroom management, and audiovisual and computer applications. Emphasis on movement education and curriculum development. Includes fifteen hours of observation-practicum in the schools. Prerequisites: pursuing education certification or major and permission of instructor. Alternate years.

327. Adaptive Physical Education
Philosophy and applications of physical education for persons with special needs and disabilities. Emphasis on designing appropriate programs and activities and teaching methodology. Includes fifteen hours of observation-practicum in the schools. Prerequisites: Pursuing education certification or major, and permission of department chair. Offered upon request.

331. Physical Education Methods for Secondary School
Preparation for the teaching of physical education activities in the secondary grades. Current trends in curriculum, planning for lessons, selection of appropriate teaching and evaluation methods, classroom management, and audiovisual and computer applications. Includes fifteen hours of observation-practicum in the schools. Prerequisite: pursuing secondary certification or permission of instructor. Alternate years.

334. Motor Learning
Process and factors related to the acquisition and performance of motor skills. General learning theories applied to motor learning and performance. Other topics include physical abilities and capabilities, psychological and mental factors influencing performance, training procedures, environmental and social factors. Prerequisite: KIN 206.

338. Advanced Athletic Training
Advanced care and prevention of athletic injuries. The course deals with specific physical conditions, disorders, and injuries common to the athletic setting. Preventative measures, evaluation, treatment, and rehabilitation of athletic injuries are covered in depth. Prerequisites: KIN 237 and junior standing.

355-359. Advanced Topics in Kinesiology
In-depth study of selected topics of current interest in the field of kinesiology. Offered subject to the availability of faculty. See Topics Courses.

362. Exercise Testing and Prescription
Practical application of physiological principles related to the assessment of functional physical capacity and the prescription of exercise for healthy adult populations, based upon American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) health-related fitness recommendations. Development of practical skills and professionalism for performing fitness assessments, including: the pre-participation screening; heart rate and blood pressure at rest and during exercise; and assessments of body composition, cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular strength, and flexibility. Includes interpretation of health-related fitness assessment results and the prescription of appropriate fitness programs for improving musculoskeletal strength and flexibility, cardiorespiratory fitness, and weight loss. Prerequisites: KIN 111, 309, and 315.

380. Internship in Physical Education
Observation of and practical experience in the specialized activities of a fitness and wellness program, an athletic or recreation management business or department, or other professional sport and exercise setting. Students work under the direction and guidance of a practicing professional with supervision by a faculty member. Internships are scheduled for two consecutive terms unless otherwise approved by the faculty supervisor.

390. Individual Project: See Additional Academic Programs, All-College Independent Study Courses 290/390.

485. Advanced Studies (1/2-1)
An independent project. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

511. Athletic Training Practicum (1/4)
Provides supervised practical experience in the prevention, evaluation, treatment, management, and rehabilitation of athletic injuries and illness. Participation in the administrative aspects of an athletic training program. Prerequisites: Must be accepted into the Cornell College Athletic Training Program. Application for admission to the program includes a written form, interview with the Head Athletic Trainer, and two letters of reference from Cornell instructors and/or coaches. (CR)