101. Europe: 800-1300
This course will trace the development of new ideas and institutions in Europe following the decline of the Carolingian era, examining the interplay between old traditions and new ideas about spirituality, law, and knowledge. Topics to include the Crusades, the culture of knights, universities, and the developing inquisition. Not open to seniors without permission of the instructor. No S/U option. (Humanities)

102. Europe: 1300-1700
This course will open by considering the impact of the Black Death upon European society, and continue through examining the Renaissance and Reformation. Did the Black Death lead to the Renaissance? What effects did these new intellectual and religious ideas have on politics, society, and culture? What role did popular movements play in the Reformation era? We will consider these questions as we explore art, literature, and documents from the period. Not open to seniors without permission of the instructor. (Humanities)

104. Modern Europe and Its Critics
Social and intellectual development of Europe since 1700. Not open to seniors without permission of the instructor. No S/U option. (Humanities)

111-120. Introductory Seminars in History
Reading of both primary and secondary sources as the basis for class discussion and papers. See Topics Courses. Not open to seniors without permission of the instructor. (Humanities)

141. Latin American History
Introduction to Latin American studies, with special attention to major themes and selected countries. Same course as LAS 141. Not open to seniors without permission of the instructor. No S/U option. (Humanities)

153. Origins of the American Nation
From colonial origins through Reconstruction, with emphasis on the formation of local, sectional, and national communities. Not open to seniors without permission of the instructor. No S/U option. (Humanities)

154. Making of Modern America
The late nineteenth century ushered in a plethora of momentous changes in the economic, political, and social spheres of American life that heralded the birth of modern society. Massive upheavals brought about by revolutions in American industry, transportation systems, immigration patterns, and urbanization fundamentally altered the very structure of American society. This course examines the underlying changes that gave rise to a new era in American history epitomized by the "mass" character of modern life by focusing on mass production, mass consumption, mass culture, and mass movements (including civil rights and women's rights) from the mid-nineteenth century through the late 1960s. Not open to seniors without permission of the instructor. No S/U option. (Humanities)

210. Warfare and Society in Modern Times
Changes in military conflict from the eighteenth century to the present. Interaction of warfare and social values. No S/U option. (Humanities)

240. Public Memory and Public History
The American public has an insatiable appetite for representations of the nation's past, as demonstrated by the popularity of historic sites, museums, historical re-enactments, televised historical documentaries and Hollywood films. Yet, despite its growing audience, the discipline of history seems to be in a state of crisis. Political debates have engendered a public furor over how American history is being taught and remembered. This course will examine the often contentious relationship between popular presentations of the past for the general public and professional historians' scholarly interpretations and provide an introduction to the growing field of museum studies. The course may include the "hands-on" experience of a mini-internship at local historical societies, libraries, and museums and the opportunity for students to create their own online exhibits on different historical topics. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permission of the Instructor. Alternate years. No S/U option. (Humanities)

251. Federal Indian Policy
Relations between Native American nations and the federal government. Central theme is the clash of cultures in the westward movement. Treaties, removal, land allotment, federal recognition in the twentieth century, and a review of the current scene. Offered subject to availability of faculty. No S/U option. (Humanities)

252. Baseball: The American Game
In many interesting ways the history of baseball from the mid-1800’s onward reflects the history of the United States.  This seminar will examine the origins of the game, its evolution to a professional sport and then big business, legal aspects of the game, integration, and unionization.  Students will write several papers and do a little research project about baseball and American society.  Find out how Cornelius McGillicuddy, Jackie Robinson, Alexander Cartwright, Curt Flood, John Montgomery Ward, Alta Weiss, and Andy Messersmith – ballplayers all – reveal something important about American history and society. (Humanities)

255. American Lives
American history through autobiographies, memoirs, and biographies. No S/U option. (Humanities)

257-262. Topics in History
Introduction to specific historical problems. Topics vary according to specialization or interest of instructor. See Topics Courses. (Humanities)

280/380. Internship: See Additional Academic Programs, All-College Independent Study Courses 280/380.

290/390. Individual Project: See Additional Academic Programs, All-College Independent Study Courses 290/390.

304. Europe: the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries
This course focuses on the tumultuous period of the Reformation and religious wars, examining the connections between religion and politics, changing social and family structures, and new spiritual ideas and fears. Readings include primary sources and microhistory to explore the beliefs and experiences of ordinary Europeans in this period. Prerequisite: HIS 102 or permission of instructor. Alternate years. (Humanities)

315. International Relations in Modern West
International Relations in the Modern Western World  A history of diplomacy from the end of World War I to the present. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. No S/U option. (Humanities)

316. Enlightenment and the French Revolution
Intellectual, social, and political history of Europe, 1715-1815. Emphasis on France. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. Offered subject to availability of faculty. No S/U option. (Humanities)

317. The Crusades
This course traces the crusading experience of western Europeans in the Middle Ages: the origins and development of the idea of crusade in the 1090s, followed by the failure of later Crusades and the change in the concept over time. More broadly, the class considers the relationship between violence and religion, and the legacy of the Crusades, including the consequences of the crusading phenomenon in Europe and how it has affected interactions between Muslims and Christians. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. (Humanities)

318. Growth of Industrial Society
Economic history of Western Europe from the beginnings of the Industrial Revolution to the end of World War II. Change from a traditional to an industrial society, effect of industrialization on the working class, and impact of the Great Depression. Prerequisites: junior standing or permission of instructor; ECB 101 is recommended. Offered subject to availability of faculty. No S/U option. (Humanities)

319. Women in Medieval Europe
This course examines how law, family structures, religious beliefs, and work shaped the experiences of European women between c. 500-1400.  As we read various works for, by, and about medieval women, among the major questions we'll examine are: What ideas about women's bodies, minds, and social roles shaped women's lives? What factors allowed women more or less agency to choose their own life's course? In addition to reading medieval sources, in the course we will read, evaluate, and critique modern scholarship on medieval women. This course also counts toward the GSS major. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. (Humanities)

320. Persecution, Tolerance, and Minorities in Medieval Europe
This course explores the marginalization and persecution of minority groups in medieval Europe, as well as the coexistence of minority and majority. Why was persecution a common reaction to minority groups, set apart by their religion, sexuality, or health, in medieval Europe? Can coexistence be described as tolerance?  What laws and customs shaped interactions between majority and minorities? This course examines these questions through reading primary sources from the European Middle Ages in translation and diverse theoretical and methodological perspectives on the study of marginalized groups. This course also counts towards the GSS major. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. (Humanities)

321. Muscovite and Imperial Russia
Topics in the history of Russia from its beginnings to 1917. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. Offered every third year. No S/U option. (Humanities)

322. Revolutionary and Soviet Russia
The 1917 Revolution and the resulting Soviet state to the beginning of World War II. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. Offered every third year. No S/U option. (Humanities)

323. Russia from 1941
From the beginning of World War II to the present. Particular attention to successive attempts to reinterpret the revolutionary legacy in the light of contemporary problems. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. Offered every third year. No S/U option. (Humanities)

324. Modern Germany
German history between 1740 and 1945, with an emphasis on important events, such as the rise of Prussia, the Napoleonic Period, Bismarck and German unification, Hitler and the Third Reich. Prerequisite: HIS 104 or junior standing. Offered subject to availability of faculty. No S/U option. (Humanities)

331-336. Topics in European History
Topics vary according to specialization or interest of instructor. See Topics Courses. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. (Humanities)

349. Topics in Latin American History
See Topics Courses.

350. Colonial America
The English colonies in North America to 1760. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. No S/U option. (Humanities)  

351. The Age of Revolution in America
The causes of the American Revolution, the writing and the implementation of the Constitution, and the War of 1812. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. No S/U option. (Humanities)  

352. The United States in the Middle Period
America from 1815 to 1850, with emphasis on the growth and consequences of political and economic stability. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. No S/U option. (Humanities)

353. Civil War and Reconstruction
America at war with itself. The causes of the war and the attempt to rebuild the Union. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. No S/U option. (Humanities)

354. U.S. Social History Since 1940
World War II as a turning point in civil rights, gender issues, class, foreign policy, and the consumer revolution. This course also counts towards the GSS major. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. No S/U option. (Humanities)

356. African-Americans in U.S. History
Selected topics on the nature of the Black experience in America. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. Alternate years. No S/U option. (Humanities)  

357. Seminar in American History
Examination of a particular theme or set of themes in American history. Topics vary from year to year. Not offered every year. May be repeated for credit. No S/U option. (Humanities)

358. Work and Leisure in Modern America
Examines the relationship between Americans' working lives and their pursuit of leisure in the transformation from the Industrial to the Post-Industrial Era (1880s-1980s). Topics will include women's changing role in the workforce; the impact of popular and mass culture (such as film, radio, and television) upon the separation of work and leisure; the decline of public culture and the rise of privatized forms of leisure; the disappearance of industrial jobs in the emerging service-information economy; and the rise of corporate cultures, such as Disney, in the global context of the current economic revolution. We will explore how the forces of urbanization, immigration, production and consumption, technological innovation, and class stratification, contributed to the bifurcation of culture into "high" and "low" as well as engendering the evolution of popular to commercial to mass culture. Offered every third year. This course also counts towards the GSS major. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. No S/U option. (Humanities)  

364. Documentary Imagination-Depression
Explores the relationship between historical truth and fiction through an examination of documentaries made of Depression Era America. Through our examination of different types of documentary expression (e.g., photography, ethnography, literature, film, and oral history), students will learn to interpret these texts as historical sources. Students may experience first-hand the stages of documentary production by conducting oral history interviews, which they videotape and edit into a final documentary narrative. Offered every third year. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. No S/U option. (Humanities)  

366-368. Topics in Modern Middle Eastern History
Topics vary according to specialization or interest of instructor. See Topics Courses. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. (Humanities)

369. Chicago: The Transformation of America's Second City, 1880-1940
This course offers students the opportunity to explore the history of Chicago and complete an original research project based upon a first-hand exploration of the city and the holdings of the Newberry Library. The seminar will examine the crucial years in Chicago's evolution from regional center to metropolis by looking at the related themes of urbanization, industrialization, and immigration. All of these developments are richly documented in the Newberry's collections, which include archival materials pertaining to urban planning and architecture, immigrant life, African American communities, industrial growth and labor relations, political development, and diverse civic and commercial cultures. Drawing upon the Library's collections, students will discover how the spatial formation of contemporary Chicago still reflects its historical origins, and will have the opportunity to use these rare materials in crafting their individual research papers. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. Offered every third year. No S/U option. (Humanities)

376-377. Topics in Asian History
 
See Topics Courses.

380. Internship in Public History
Application of historical concepts to an agency in the public sector (a museum, historical society, historic preservation program), a government agency, or a corporation with a history program. Prerequisites: junior standing and three courses in American history, at least two of which must be at the 300 level. See Additional Academic Programs, All-College Independent Study Courses 280/380. No S/U option.

394. History and Theory
Survey of the influences in the field of history of Marxism, feminist theories, and theories of race and ethnicity. Prerequisites: junior standing and three courses in History, at least two of which must be at the 300-level. Offered subject to availability of faculty. No S/U option. (Humanities)

485. Research Tutorial
A project, taken after any 300-level History course, enabling a student to engage in additional research on a theme related to that course. Prerequisites: a 300-level History course and permission of instructor. No S/U option. (Humanities)