ENG 111-2. Farming, Food, Sustainability (W) 
News about food and sustainability is everywhere today. Using both popular and academic works about contemporary debates, this course will help you to begin your journey as a college reader and writer on a strong footing. May include guest speakers and field trips. Not open to students who have previously completed a writing course. (Writing Requirement (W)) MOUTON

ENG 111-2. Be Transformed: Fairy Tales, Literary Lives, and the Creative Process (W)
Fairy tales have fired the imagination of children, storytellers, entertainers, and authors for centuries. They have also provoked vigorous critical argument: some dismiss them as trite little (girl) stories or escapist fantasies, others celebrate them as emancipatory dreams, or creative powerhouses. The feminist revisionist of traditional fairy tales Angela Carter has identified an aspect of fairy tales central to the concerns of this course: “a fiction absolutely self-conscious of itself as a different form of human experience than reality . . . can help to transform reality itself.” Our test case for Carter’s claim will be Shakespeare’s tragedy Othello – a tragedy of racial and ethnic difference. The play reworks the familiar story of “Beauty and the Beast” and contains fragments of other tales featuring an Egyptian witch, a maid from Barbary, slaves and cannibals, a conniving devil. In this first-year writing course, in addition to Shakespeare’s play, we will analyze several “Beauty and the Beast” fairy tales and their modern adaptations, among them Carter’s stories “The Courtship of Mr. Lyon” and its foil, “The Tiger’s Bride.” We will screen and discuss a film adaptation of Othello, such as an eponymous 2005 Bulgarian prison documentary directed by Ivan Maldenov or George Cukor’s 1947 film noir, A Double Life. Recurring questions will address the kinds of transformations made possible, truncated, or illuminated by story-telling in these texts. Written assignments, including one involving library research, will challenge your creativity and hone your analytical and critical reading skills. Plan on daily writing, reflection on the writing process, and thoughtful, transformational revision. Not open to students who have completed their writing course (W) requirement. (Writing Requirement (W)) STAVREVA

ENG 111-3. Visionary & Outsider Art (W)
In the 1940s, painter Jean Dubuffet coined the term Art Brut—raw art—to describe art made in “solitude and from pure and authentic creative impulses,” by people working outside galleries and art schools, without the pressures of trained techniques, market trends, or competition. Dubuffet’s term and the work it describes have been debated ever since, alternately dubbed outsider, intuitive, self-taught, naïve, found, vernacular, visionary...the list and the categories go on. But what does it mean for an artist to exist “outside” the art world? Is it even possible to remain untainted by the culture in which one lives? What do we mean when we talk about outsider or visionary art? Why is it increasingly popular? How do we view the people who make it? In this course, we will investigate such questions by looking at and writing about outsider and visionary art—from snapshots stashed in attics to magical machines built of wire and paint, from a backyard filled with sculptures of the Garden of Eden to contemporary graffiti. Students will hone skills in analyzing sources, engage in several different types of academic writing, and conduct their own research projects. Because this is a writing course, significant course time will be spent on the writing process, with a focus on revision. Not open to students who have previously completed ENG 111. (Writing Requirement (W)) MCAULIFFE

ENG 111-4. Literary Responses to War (W)
Walt Whitman said of the Civil War that the “real war will never get in the books.” What versions of war, then, do get in books? And how does literary form reflect the history of war? This course will expose students to different artistic responses to war and the critical skills necessary to analyze them. Course discussions will consider the limitations of representation and documentation as well as the uses and ethics of art. Our foremost concern will not be with “what happened” but with how what happened has been represented – or not represented. Because this is a first-year writing course, we will also spend significant time on the processes of drafting, revision, and scholarly research. Not open to students who have completed their writing course (W) requirement. (Writing Requirement (W)) ENTEL

ENG 111-4. Be Transformed: Fairy Tales, Literary Lives, and the Creative Process (W)
Fairy tales have fired the imagination of children, storytellers, entertainers, and authors for centuries. They have also provoked vigorous critical argument: some dismiss them as trite little (girl) stories or escapist fantasies, others celebrate them as emancipatory dreams, or creative powerhouses. The feminist revisionist of traditional fairy tales Angela Carter has identified an aspect of fairy tales central to the concerns of this course: “a fiction absolutely self-conscious of itself as a different form of human experience than reality . . . can help to transform reality itself.” Our test case for Carter’s claim will be Shakespeare’s tragedy Othello – a tragedy of racial and ethnic difference. The play reworks the familiar story of “Beauty and the Beast” and contains fragments of other tales featuring an Egyptian witch, a maid from Barbary, slaves and cannibals, a conniving devil. In this first-year writing course, in addition to Shakespeare’s play, we will analyze several “Beauty and the Beast” fairy tales and their modern adaptations, among them Carter’s stories “The Courtship of Mr. Lyon” and its foil, “The Tiger’s Bride.” We will screen and discuss a film adaptation of Othello, such as an eponymous 2005 Bulgarian prison documentary directed by Ivan Maldenov or George Cukor’s 1947 film noir, A Double Life. Recurring questions will address the kinds of transformations made possible, truncated, or illuminated by story-telling in these texts. Written assignments, including one involving library research, will challenge your creativity and hone your analytical and critical reading skills. Plan on daily writing, reflection on the writing process, and thoughtful, transformational revision. Not open to students who have completed their writing course (W) requirement. (Writing Requirement (W)) STAVREVA

ENG 111-6. Exiles, Immigrants, & Identity (W) 
What does it mean to be an exile? an immigrant? Economic uncertainty, climate change, and political conflicts mean that the number of people migrating from one part of the world to another has increased tremendously. But what do these experiences mean for those who move, those who stay, and those who make room for the newcomers? This course will look at the experience of immigration in several countries, including Uganda, India, South Africa, and Nigeria. Texts will include literature by Indian, South African and Nigerian writers and critical articles on immigration and identity. Emphasis on critical reading, writing and revision. Some attention paid to writing style as well. Not open to students who have completed their writing course (W) requirement. (Writing Requirement (W)) REED

ENG 373-2. Reading and Writing in the City: Literature and Social Justice in Chicago
The city of Chicago has always been home to writers involved in social justice movements. Using Chicago as a backdrop, this interdisciplinary course will question the relationship between literature and society. Through reading in both disciplines , archival research, and visits to local organizations, students will explore the challenges and constraints faced by individuals and groups seeking social change; the rhetoric used by individual authors and by organizations seeking social change; the construction of identity in social movements; and the role of literature in reform movements. This course counts toward the English major as a Social/Global Concerns course and as a 19th-century group course; This course counts towards the Sociology Major. Cross listed with SOC 350. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or 102 or ENG 201, 202, or 215. At the Chicago -McLennan Center. (Interdisciplinary) ENTEL and BARNES-BRUS

ENG 381-3. Advanced Topic: Distinguished Visiting Writer: Art, Comics, and Transformative Journalism with Jacqueline Roche. 
What is the role of the image in journalism? Why do photographs resonate differently from text? How can art tell a factual story? In this hands-on course, students will explore the burgeoning world of visual journalism, examining comic books, infographics, and even virtual reality landscapes as platforms for sharing information and encouraging empathy. As a capstone for the course, students will put observed methods into practice, ultimately creating transformative visual journalism projects of their own. The goal of this course is to explore how art combined with reporting can deepen public understanding of and engagement with complex topics. Readings will include critically acclaimed non-fiction graphic novels and comic books, plays, immersive infographics, and more. Students do not need to have a journalism or arts background to enroll but must be prepared to actively participate in a course that combines theory, analysis, and creative practice. You will make something new every day. (Fine Arts) ROCHE

ENG 382-7. Advanced Topic: Distinguished Journalism: Reporting from Margins With Deborah Jian Lee
Communities form around any number of factors: class, race, gender, sexuality, faith and politics, as well as shared narratives as broad as migration or homelessness and as specific as refugee girls escaping forced marriages or LGBTQ evangelicals clashing with church authorities. As a class we will explore various marginalized communities, learning to identify what makes each unique and how to capture their stories with nuance, respect and complexity. What sets these groups apart? What knits them together? What impact are they having on the rest of society? Students will engage these questions through readings, discussions, writing exercises, guest speakers and field trips. Most importantly, students will answer these questions and hone their journalistic skills in the real world. Students will employ the tools of immersion journalism to shed light on communities that exist on the margins of society. Each student will choose one community to focus on for the entire term; this is their “beat.” They will spend most of their time immersed in their beat, applying classroom lessons on the ground. They will learn how to find fresh stories, how to choose strong sources, how to conduct revealing interviews, how to ensure balance and accuracy in reporting, how to structure stories and how to write cinematically. (Humanities) LEE