205. Historical Foundations of Education
This course explores the historical, sociological, and philosophical foundations of education. The class will draw upon the broad, theoretical issues of education through a variety of written and discussion-based activities. Particular attention is paid to curriculum theory, the civic and democratic mission of the common schools movement, Dewey and the Progressive Era of schooling, and the current social context of schools. Students are encouraged to critically analyze the purpose of schooling and to further develop their own philosophies of education through reflection and dialogue. No S/U option. (Humanities)

215. Educational Psychology
The factors that influence the nature and quality of growth, development, and learning during the educational process. Examination, through the use of recent research and illustrative examples, of important psychological characteristics of children and adolescents as learners, and of teachers and the teaching process in the elementary and secondary schools. Fifteen practicum hours required in the schools. Students must provide their own transportation. No S/U option. Not open to juniors and seniors without permission of instructor. (Social Science) 

216. Education Policy and Practice
This course will explore education policies and their relationship to sociological patterns of school resegregation, the rise of credentialism, the end of educational expansion, and inequality of educational opportunity. Students in the course will be introduced to the history of policymaking in education beginning with the education reform policies of Horace Mann. Students will also examine demographic data on educational attainment, analyze the policies that alleviate or reinforce educational inequality, and describe what assumptions lie behind current reform ideas. We will evaluate the dynamics of current debates by referencing the long-standing tensions among the different purposes of schooling we have in our nation. Same course as POL 216. (Social Science)

230. Exceptional Learner
An introduction to understanding the diversity of learners in K-12 classrooms and how differentiated teaching methods and materials are essential to create a more inclusive and equitable environment for all students. The major focus of the course will be identifying the strengths and challenges of students to increase engagement and raise achievement through varied approaches to teaching culturally and linguistically diverse learners and students with documented needs. Fifteen hours of observation-practicum in the schools. Students must provide their own transportation. No S/U option. (Social Science)  

240. Education and Culture
This course explores the influence of social issues such as discrimination, diversity, equity, racism, sexism, homophobia, and ethnic and socioeconomic pluralism in American schools. The goals for this class are to understand and be sensitive to the values, beliefs, lifestyles, and attitudes of individuals and the diverse groups found in a pluralistic society and to translate knowledge of human relations into attitudes, skills, and techniques that will support favorable learning experiences. Through critical analysis, this course reveals ways in which dehumanizing biases may be reflected in instructional materials, methodologies, media, and everyday encounters, and students learn how these interactions may influence classroom dynamics and student learning. This course also counts towards the GSS major. No S/U option. (Social Science) 

260-265. Topics in Education
In-depth study of selected topics in the field of education. No S/U option. See Topics Courses.

270. Comparative Education in Belize
This is an off-campus course offered on San Pedro island in the country of Belize. Students spend time in the local schools interacting with students, parents, teachers and community members. Study includes analysis of the island’s various cultural groups including Mestizzo, Mayan, Hispanic, Garifuna and Creole populations. Students are introduced to the basic principles of qualitative and ethnographic research for the purposes of completing a qualitative research project based upon their off-campus experience. Prerequisites: Writing course, EDU 215 and 240. (Social Science)

280/380. Internship: See Additional Academic Programs, All-College Independent Study Courses 280/380.

314. Methods of Elementary Mathematics
Current elementary school methods of instruction, lesson planning, computer applications, student assessment, and classroom management. Thirty hours of observation-practicum in the schools. Students must provide their own transportation. This course must be taken PRIOR to student teaching. No S/U option. Additional Prerequisites: junior standing and admission to Teacher Education Program. (Teacher Preparation) 

317. Methods of Elementary Science and Social Studies
Current elementary school methods in the teaching of natural science and social studies. Special emphasis on the development of interdisciplinary methods, the development of curricular units, lesson design, computer applications, student assessment, and classroom management. Thirty hours of observation-practicum in the schools. Students must provide their own transportation. This course must be taken PRIOR to student teaching. No S/U option. (Teacher Preparation)

318. Methods of Elementary Language Arts and Reading
Current elementary school methods in the teaching of reading, instructional planning, language acquisition, student assessment, and teaching materials in the field of elementary language arts and reading. Reading Recovery, Title I, and other reading support programs are addressed. Development of a curriculum unit in both subject areas. Thirty hours of observation-practicum in the schools. Students must provide their own transportation. This course must be taken PRIOR to student teaching. No S/U option. (Teacher Preparation)

319. Children's Literature
Comparative study of literary texts for children, including instructional planning, the teaching of reading, the use of literature with elementary students, and student assessment. Thirty hours of observation-practicum in the schools. Students must provide their own transportation. This course must be taken PRIOR to student teaching. No S/U option. (Teacher Preparation)

322. Secondary Arts, Languages, and Adolescent Literature
Current secondary school issues in pedagogy and classroom management, including subject matter and instructional planning in the methods of teaching art, English/language arts, reading, speech communications, adolescent literature, and foreign languages. Development of lesson plans, curriculum units, student assessment, and technological enhancements for the purposes of teaching and learning. Requires thirty-five hours of observation-practicum in the schools. Students must provide their own transportation. This course must be taken PRIOR to student teaching. No S/U option. Prerequisites: EDU 205, 215, 230, 240, junior standing, and admission to Teacher Education Program. (Teacher Preparation) 

324. Secondary Math, Science, and Social Studies
Current secondary school issues in pedagogy and classroom management, including instructional planning and methods of teaching mathematics, natural sciences, social sciences, and history. Students will participate in the development of lesson plans, curriculum units, student assessment, and technological enhancements for the purposes of teaching and learning. Requires, thirty-five hours of observation-practicum in the schools. Students must provide their own transportation. This course must be taken PRIOR to student teaching. No S/U option. Prerequisites: EDU 205, 215, 230, 240, junior standing, and admission to Teacher Education Program. (Teacher Preparation)

328. Content Area Reading, Instructional Strategies and Management Theory for Secondary Teachers
This course equips students with content area reading methods, instructional strategies and management techniques at the secondary level.  Students complete a 40 hour practicum at the junior high or high school level, and they must provide their own transportation to the school site. It is highly recommended that this course must be taken PRIOR to student teaching. No S/U option. Prerequisites: EDU 205, 215, 230, 240, junior standing, and admission to Teacher Education Program. Sophomores may take this course with instructor approval. (Teacher Preparation)

330. Foundations of Literacy
This course is designed to facilitate an understanding of the processes of literacy development for elementary learners. Diversity, in its many forms, will frame many of the discussions on the ways literacy is culturally situated within elementary classrooms. A range of research-based reading and writing theories will be examined as well as the history of reading and writing theories.  A focus on the major components of reading (phonemic awareness, word identification/phonic, vocabulary, fluency and comprehension in context) and the integration of technology in literacy learning will be emphasized. Lastly, how, as elementary teachers, might reading struggles be mediated and authenticated via natural learning experiences for diverse students will be discussed throughout the course. Prerequisites: Admittance to the Teacher Preparation Program/Education Department (during the sophomore year) and either EDU 318 Language Arts or Reading and EDU 319 Children’s Literature. Summer 2014 online. Alternate years. DOES NOT COUNT TOWARDS THE ELEMENTARY EDUCATION MAJOR

340. Language, Literacy, and Communication
This course is designed to teach pre-service teachers how to recognize and implement appropriate environmental strategies that support early literacy development and appropriate early experiences with reading and writing. Emphasis is placed on speaking and listening, as well as reading and writing readiness. A repertoire of strategies that include (1) plans for creating language- and literacy–rich classroom environments and (2) activities that intentionally promote early literacy development will be developed. Developmentally appropriate strategies consistent with current knowledge of how young children develop, learn, and thrive in a literacy-rich environment will be emphasized.  Upon completion of the course, students will be able to select, plan, implement, and evaluate appropriate early literacy experiences. Prerequisites: Admittance to the Teacher Preparation Program/Education Department (during the sophomore year) and either EDU 318 Language Arts or Reading and EDU 319 Children’s Literature. Summer 2015 online. Alternate years. DOES NOT COUNT TOWARDS THE ELEMENTARY EDUCATION MAJOR

350. Literacy in Content Areas: Elementary
Educators must first and foremost recognize the fact that reading and writing, far from being isolated areas of study, touch upon all facets of learning in each and every content area.  The major goal of this course, then, is to understand how, as elementary teachers of all content areas, might employ developmentally appropriate literacy strategies to enhance content area learning.  Students will become familiar with the Title I laws in Iowa and take a close look at the kind of reading support Title I teachers offer. Prerequisites: Admittance to the Teacher Preparation Program/Education Department (during the sophomore year) and either EDU 318 Language Arts or Reading and EDU 319 Children’s Literature. Summer 2014 online. Alternate years. DOES NOT COUNT TOWARDS THE ELEMENTARY EDUCATION MAJOR

360. Reading Assessment, Diagnosis, and Evaluation
This course will examine reading assessment theory, materials and procedures.  The foundational concepts of reading assessment, diagnosis and evaluation will be developed.   Additionally, the uses of reading assessment and the communication of reading assessment results will be emphasized. Students will engage in a variety of reading assessments with two elementary students that are valid and reliable so as to make on-going instructional changes and to maintain successful classroom literacy practice. Prerequisites: Admittance to the Teacher Preparation Program/Education Department (during the sophomore year) and either EDU 318 Language Arts or Reading and EDU 319 Children’s Literature. Summer 2015 online. Alternate years. DOES NOT COUNT TOWARDS THE ELEMENTARY EDUCATION MAJOR.

390. Individual Project: See Additional Academic Programs, All-College Independent Study Courses 390. (CR)

410. Student Teaching I
A 14-week clinical teaching experience under the direction of Cornell faculty and certified K-12 school teachers in approved elementary or secondary schools. A bi-weekly on-campus evening seminar is required. These three courses must be scheduled in consecutive terms during the senior year or during a fifth year. Required for a teaching certification recommendation. Students must provide their own transportation. EDU 440 may be required depending upon public shool calendars and for student pursuing K-8 and 5-12 certification. Prerequisites: All 200- and 300-level Education courses and approval of the Education Department. (CR) (Teacher Preparation) 

420. Student Teaching II
A 14-week clinical teaching experience under the direction of Cornell faculty and certified K-12 school teachers in approved elementary or secondary schools. A bi-weekly on-campus evening seminar is required. These three courses must be scheduled in consecutive terms during the senior year or during a fifth year. Required for a teaching certification recommendation. Students must provide their own transportation. EDU 440 may be required depending upon public shool calendars and for student pursuing K-8 and 5-12 certification. Prerequisites: All 200- and 300-level Education courses and approval of the Education Department. (CR) (Teacher Preparation) 

430. Student Teaching III
A 14-week clinical teaching experience under the direction of Cornell faculty and certified K-12 school teachers in approved elementary or secondary schools. A bi-weekly on-campus evening seminar is required. These three courses must be scheduled in consecutive terms during the senior year or during a fifth year. Required for a teaching certification recommendation. Students must provide their own transportation. EDU 440 may be required depending upon public shool calendars and for student pursuing K-8 and 5-12 certification. Prerequisites: All 200- and 300-level Education courses and approval of the Education Department. (CR) (Teacher Preparation)

440. Student Teaching IV
A 14-week clinical teaching experience under the direction of Cornell faculty and certified K-12 school teachers in approved elementary or secondary schools. A bi-weekly on-campus evening seminar is required. These three courses must be scheduled in consecutive terms during the senior year or during a fifth year. Required for a teaching certification recommendation. Students must provide their own transportation. EDU 440 may be required depending upon public shool calendars and for student pursuing K-8 and 5-12 certification. Prerequisites: All 200- and 300-level Education courses and approval of the Education Department. (CR) (Teacher Preparation)

450/460/470/471. Music Student Teaching 1-IV

483. Senior Seminar
Students complete this capstone course upon conclusion of their student teaching.  Involves critical examination of current educational controversies, reform ideas, ethical considerations, legal questions, and administrative problems facing modern American education. Students complete a detailed professional portfolio, a five-year professional development plan and, a qualitative research paper. Credit/No Credit (CR). (Teacher Preparation)