Journal Cover legend:  Hypothermia stimulates increased expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-11, which reduces tumor necrosis factor-alpha-dependent neuroprotection from cold-preconditioning.  Triple label confocal image shows pyramidal neurons (green) predominantly (yellow) express interleukin 11 (red) after cold-preconditioning in hippocampal slice cultures while astrocytes (blue) occasionally show increased interleukin-11 expression. 


Kara tests DNA

Kara Middleton genotyped 23 loci in 9 different genes hypothesized to be associated with Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), a heart defect that is common complication of pre-term birth.

Undergraduate Research

Annually, a Cornell student is selected to conduct research via the University of Chicago Summer Research Program in Neuroscience. This experience provides either a sophomore or a junior with an outstanding opportunity to engage in original neurological research with Dr. Richard Kraig (’71) that is slated for submission in a peer-reviewed publication.  

The following Cornell students have previously conducted research in the Kraig lab:

  • Wade Swenson (’07)  Mr. Swenson was a co-author on the article “ Monomeric IgG Is Neuroprotective via Enhancing Microglial Recycling Endocytosis and TNF- alpha” which was published in the November 19, 2008 edition of The Journal of Neuroscience.
  • Miki Otis (’07)
  • Heidi Mitchell (’08)  Ms. Mitchell was primary author on the article “Cold-Preconditioning Neuroprotection Depends on TNF-alpha and is Enhanced by Blockade of Interleukin-11” which was published in Volume 112 (February 2010) of the Journal of Neurochemistry (See Cover Image on upper right of this page). Ms. Mitchell currently works full-time in the Kraig lab.
  • Michael Jay Welvaert (’10)
  • Vicki Levasseur (’11)
  • Neal Klauer (’12)
  • Megan Dibbern ('12)  Ms. Dibbern completed a summer placement in the Kraig lab and then returned during 4th block of 2011 to continue work on their work. This project became the topic for her honors thesis which resulted in her graduating with distinction. Her thesis is entitled, "Spreading Depression Preferentially Increases Oxidative Stress in Microglia and Astrocytes: Implications for the Chronification of Migraine”

Summer Research at Cornell

The Dimensions program supports collaborative faculty/student research in the sciences during summers on campus. Projects span a wide range of disciplines and topics in the natural, physical, and social sciences. All projects provide exceptional, hands-on training in all aspects of research, providing our students with critical skills necessary for success in graduate school or other laboratory settings.

Dimensions funding covers a stipend for the faculty and for the student, as well as supplies needed to support the research. Abstracts and photos of previously-funded research projects can be accessed via these links:

Off-Campus Research

Cornell students can also obtain research experience away from the Hilltop. The following databases can be utilized to search for  research opportunities at other colleges, including opportunities at medical and dental schools. You must submit an application for these experiences.  Please be aware that many of these deadlines fall between December and February.