2008-2009 Catalogue Supplement

A Supplementary Catalogue listing all permanent changes to the curriculum made since the publication of the 2008-2009 Catalogue. This version of deTERMinations is for the 2008-2009 academic year.

Course descriptions for topics courses being offered this year and information on courses being offered off-campus are also available on this site.

Updated April 10, 2009


Course Changes:

  • CANCEL ART 9-104-A Studio Art Basics: Photo Imaging
  • ADD ART 4-151 Art and Culture McOMBER
  • CHANGE ART 3-104 Studio Art Basics: Photo Imaging 2-dimensional Art
  • CANCEL ART 7-264 African American Art
  • TOPIC CHANGE BIO 3-108 Topic: Food, Sex, and Violence: An Evolutionary (and Gendered) Perspective
  • CANCEL BIO 5-108 Topic: Living with Germs
  • ADD BIO 8-108 Topic: Human Ecology and Agriculture NOWAK-THOMPSON
  • CANCEL BIO 3-211 Evolution
  • CANCEL CHE 9-262 Topic: Environmental Chemistry
  • ADD COM 3-235 Oral Interpretation STAFF
  • CANCEL COM 5-277 Topic: The Blogosphere and the Decentralization of Journalistic Authority STAFF
  • ADD COM 7-278 Topic: The Language of Film STAFF
  • ADD COM 4-326 Argumentation and Debate STAFF
  • CANCEL ECB 9-101 Macroeconomics
  • CANCEL ECB 3-355 Multinational Corporations in Historical Perspective Seminar
  • CANCEL ECB 9-366 Advanced Topic: Public Policy Seminar
  • CANCEL ECB 6-367 Advanced Topic: Methods of Public Policy Analysis
  • ADD ENG 3-111-B Topic: Something Wicked This Way Comes: Monsters in Film and Literature JACKSON
  • TOPIC CHANGE ENG 5-111-A Topic: The Fictions of Racial Identity ENTEL
  • TOPIC CHANGE ENG 8-111-A Topic: The Fictions of Racial Identity ENTEL
  • ADD ENG 8-111-B Topic: Something Wicked This Way Comes: Monsters in Film and Literature JACKSON
  • CANCEL ENG 5-381 Advanced Topic: Distinguished Visiting Poet Seminar
  • ADD ENG 9-381 Advanced Topic: Distinguished Visiting Poet Seminar STAFF
  • ADD ENV 6-261 Topic: Environmental Issues G. FREEMAN/McCOLLUM
  • TOPIC CHANGE HIS 4-333 Advanced Topic: The Crusades EPURESCU-PASCOVICI
  • ADD HIS 3-118 Introductory Seminar: Growing Up Crazy: From Flappers to Flower Children (The Rise and Fall of Youth Culture) R. THOMAS
  • CANCEL HIS 7-336 Advanced Topic: Medieval Romantic Love MILLER
  • TOPIC CHANGE HIS 7-334 Advanced Topic: National Identity, Community, and Race in the Middle Ages EPURESCU-PASCOVICI
  • CANCEL HIS 9-357 Seminar: Constitution and Racism: The Japanese-American Experience
  • CANCEL KIN 3-255 Topic: History of Women's Sports
  • ADD MAT 6-110 On the Shoulders of Giants: Great Mathematical Ideas BEAN
  • CANCEL MAT 6-338 Analysis II
  • ADD POL 4-352 Advanced Topic: Economic Regulation in the U.S. GODEK
  • CANCEL POL 1-353 Advanced Topics in Public Policy
  • ADD POL 4-262 American Politics GODEK
  • CANCEL POL 4-352 Advanced Topic: Economic Regulation in the U.S.
  • ADD POL 6-282 Public Policy GODEK
  • CANCEL POL 9-331 Gender and Development
  • CANCEL POL 6-382 Methods of Public Policy Analysis GODEK
  • CANCEL PSY 9-161 Fundamentals of Psychological Science
  • ADD PSY 8-257 Topic: Cultural Competence: Melting Pots and Salad Bowls BUSHA
  • CANCEL PSY 3-485 Research in Psychology
  • CANCEL REL 7-267 Topic: Religion and Memoir
  • CANCEL RUS 9-355 Russian Literature and Film, 1932-Present
  • ADD SPA 7-205 Intermediate Spanish OCHOA-SHIVAPOUR
  • CANCEL SPA 7-381 Peninsular Culture and Civilization (in Spain)
  • CANCEL THE 0-373 Advanced Topic: Global Performance: The Edinburgh Festivals
  • CANCEL WST 4-171 Introduction to Women's Studies

Off-Campus Courses Taught by Cornell Faculty

These courses usually involve additional costs and require advance planning. Consult the Office of International and Off-Campus Studies website for course descriptions, prerequisites, deadlines, and costs.

  • ANT 5-206 West Indian People and Culture (Trinidad and Barbados) MONAGAN
  • ART 34-103/202 Drawing I and Ceramics I (Japan) HANSON
  • ART 7-377 Advanced Topic: City of Rome (Rome, Italy) McOMBER
  • BIO 1-209 Plant Morphology (Wilderness Field Station, MN) CONDON
  • BIO 1-321 Ecology (Wilderness Field Station, MN) McCOLLUM
  • BIO/BMB 2-485 Biological Problems (in Peru) CONDON
  • BIO/BMB 6-485 Biological Problems (in the Bahamas) BLACK/TEPPER
  • CLA 7-377 Advanced Topic: City of Rome (Rome, Italy) GRUBER-MILLER
  • EDU 8-205 Foundations of Education (in Greece) MACKLER
  • EDU 2-260 Topic: Policy to Practice: Comparative Educational Systems, the United States and southern Africa (in southern Africa) LUCK
  • ENG 8-322 Medieval and Renaissance Drama (Newberry Library, Chicago) STAVREVA
  • ENG 1-347 Modern American Literature (Wilderness Field Station, MN) HANKINS
  • ENG 2-374 Advanced Topic: Southern African Art, Literature, and Culture in Context (in southern Africa) REED
  • GEO 9-223 Geology of the National Parks (Washington) WALSH
  • GEO 6-255 Modern and Ancient Carbonate Systems of the Bahamas (in the Bahamas) GREENSTEIN
  • GEO 9-320 Geomorphology (Washington) DENNISTON
  • KIN 9-101 Fitness for Life: Outdoor Activity (Boundary Waters, MN) MEEKER
  • POL 6-225 Ethics and Public Policy (Texas Presidential Libraries) SUTHERLAND
  • POL 1-371 Wilderness Politics (Wilderness Field Station, MN) ALLIN
  • REL 9-366 Advanced Topic: Islam and Postcoloniality in Contemporary Morocco (in Morocco) BATY/SACKS
  • RUS 9-384 Russia Today (in Russia) GIVENS
  • SPA 7-381 Peninsular Culture and Civilization (in Spain) CANCELLED
  • THE 3-370 Advanced Topic: Contemporary Theatre (in New York) OLINGER

Course Information:

Linked Courses:

 

  •  PHY 1-125 linked with ENG 4-111-B.
    Both courses must be taken. (Not open to returning students.)
  • POL 1-242 linked with RUS 2-281.
    Both courses must be taken. (Not open to returning students.)

  •  SOC 1-101 linked with GEO 3-111.
    Both courses must be taken. (Not open to returning students.)

Parallel Courses:

  •    ART 34-103/34-202. Drawing I and Ceramics I (in Japan).
    Taken over terms 3 and 4 in Japan. (Fine Arts) HANSON
  • ART 67-103/67-202. Drawing I and Ceramics I.
    Taken over terms 6 and 7. (Fine Arts) COLEMAN/STAFF

 

Elementary Education Requirement Change:

MUS 101. Fundamentals of Music. Basic music reading skills for all interested students, while learning to listen to and recognize the structural and aesthetic elements of music. Preparation for MUS 110. This course satisfies the music requirement for Elementary Education majors to teach music in the elementary schools. (Fine Arts)

ANTHROPOLOGY

    7-356. Advanced Topic: Medical Anthropology. Cross-cultural perspective on the cause and treatment of physiological and psychological illnesses. Topics include ethnomedicine, ethnobotany (bush medicine), health-related practices in traditional and industrial societies, culturally appropriate nutrition education, and caring for patients from different cultures. Prerequisite: ANT 101. (Social Science) MONAGAN

ART

    4-263. African Art. Survey of the visual arts of Africa south of the Sahara based on the cycle of life in Africa. Culture and art objects will be discussed thematically, focusing on issues of birth and abundance, initiations, sexuality and partnership, status and royalty, secret societies, as well as death and the ancestors. Topics discussed will include traditional dress, decorated utensils and weapons, body arts, sculpture, painting, weaving, pottery, and architecture. The emphasis will be placed on the object as art form and as conceptual tool to translate socio-political ideas. (Humanities) CLUNIS [AH]

    7-264. African American Art. This course provides an introduction to the visual arts produced by people of African descent in the United States from colonial times to the present. Artists, art movements, the relationship of art to politics, and the formation of racial and cultural identity will be examined. The emphasis will be placed on the object as art form and as conceptual tool to translate socio-political ideas. Offered alternate years. (Humanities) CLUNIS [AH]

    9-362. Art Since 1960. This course looks at the major movements, aesthetic theories, and critical debates related to art in the late 20th century in order to gain a better understanding of the diversity of contemporary practices. Students will be introduced to Minimalism, conceptual art, institutional critique, feminist art, process and body art, postmodernism, abject art, and globalism. Prerequisite: 200-level art history course. Alternate years. (Humanities) CLUNIS [AH]

    7-377. Advanced Topic: City of Rome (Rome, Italy). This course, taught in Italy, traces the evolving nature of the Eternal City from antiquity and the world of Julius Caesar to Mussolini's vision of a New Rome and Empire in Fascist Italy. Topics include the evolution of the ancient city into the capital of the Roman empire, the Christianization of Rome, the revival of the past through Renaissance urban planning, and the Church Triumphant of the early modern popes. We will visit many of the most important sites and museums in Rome such the Forum, the Colosseum, and the Pantheon, Saint Peter's, Bramante’s Tempietto, and the Trevi Fountain. Registration entails additional cost. Optional weekend trips to Pompeii, Florence or Venice are possible, but also will entail additional cost. (Same course as CLA 7-377.) Prerequisites: writing-designated course (W), and any 100- or 200-level Art History or Classical Studies course (CLA, GRE, or LAT). (Humanities) McOMBER

BIOLOGY

    3-108. Topic: Food, Sex, and Violence: An Evolutionary (and Gendered) Perspective. This course examines the social behavior of humans (and other primates) from an evolutionary perspective. Topics range from meiosis to meat-eating and warfare. (Science) CONDON

    4-108. Topic: Current Topics in Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior. How is climate change affecting plants and animals? Are our fisheries sustainable? Do we want to grow genetically engineered pharmaceutical crops in Iowa? Do species other than humans have "culture"? These topics have all been in the news lately. This course will investigate the science behind some of the biological news reported over the last year or so. Using recent news reports as starting points, we will explore several topics related to ecology, evolutionary biology and animal behavior. We will go beyond the news to learn what scientists have discovered and how they have obtained the information leading to what you see reported (or misreported) in the news. Along the way, we will discuss the philosophy and process of science to see how our understanding of the natural world has grown and is still growing. (Science) McCOLLUM

    8-108. Topic: Human Ecology and Agriculture. This course will develop some of the underlying scientific concepts to explain how modern agricultural practices have affected our environmental resources. We will also spend time examining how socioeconomic factors have made it difficult to adopt more sustainable alternatives in the past, but that changes in public awareness and the greening of economic markets offers an opportunity to establish more equitable and sustainable practices. (Science) NOWAK-THOMPSON

    7-381. Advanced Topic: Molecular Evolution. Genes, genomes, and proteins are products of evolution: how do they evolve? Understanding the evolution of molecules is critically important to fields of medicine, agriculture, and conservation and to the reconstruction of the evolutionary history of all organisms. Prerequisite: BIO 205; BIO 211 or familiarity with population genetics and phylogenetic methods are strongly recommended. This course can be used to satisfy the "cell" distribution requirement for both BIO and BMB majors. CONDON

    6-382. Advanced Topic: Chemical Ecology. An investigation of how naturally occurring chemicals influence ecological interactions within the context of plant growth, insect and animal behavior, and microbial ecology. Special emphasis will be on the chemical structures and metabolic pathways of these chemicals within the host organism. Prerequisites: BIO 142 and CHE 225. NOWAK-THOMPSON

CHEMISTRY

    1-108. Topic: Chemistry of Global Health Issues. Unsafe drinking water, infectious diseases, malnutrition, industrial pollution -- these are all serious global health concerns. What is the chemistry behind these problems? How can an understanding of chemistry help us evaluate possible solutions? This course will begin with a basic introduction to chemistry and move into an examination of the chemistry behind global health challenges such as the provision of clean drinking water, the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases, and the production of food to feed the world. Intended for non-science majors; no previous experience in chemistry required. (Science) STRONG

    4-108. Topic: The Science of Energy. The concept of energy is central to all the natural sciences. This course will examine how energy is defined, measured, and used to understand and predict the behavior of matter. (Science) CARDON

CLASSICS

    7-377. Advanced Topic: City of Rome (Rome, Italy). This course, taught in Italy, traces the evolving nature of the Eternal City from antiquity and the world of Julius Caesar to Mussolini's vision of a New Rome and Empire in Fascist Italy. Topics include the evolution of the ancient city into the capital of the Roman empire, the Christianization of Rome, the revival of the past through Renaissance urban planning, and the Church Triumphant of the early modern popes. We will visit many of the most important sites and museums in Rome such the Forum, the Colosseum, and the Pantheon, Saint Peter's, Bramante’s Tempietto, and the Trevi Fountain. Registration entails additional cost. Optional weekend trips to Pompeii, Florence or Venice are possible, but also will entail additional cost. (Same course as ART 7-377.) Prerequisites: writing-designated course (W), and any 100- or 200-level Art History or Classical Studies course (CLA, GRE, or LAT). (Humanities) GRUBER-MILLER

COMMUNICATIONS

    7-278. Topic: The Language of Film. This course explores the ways in which film works as a unique medium of communication, exploring some of the formal and technical characteristics of film as a narrative medium, but also examining the relationship between film and spectator, with all the psychological, sociological, political, and theoretical implications of that relationship. The course is intended to serve as an introduction to film studies. STAFF

COMPUTER SCIENCE

    2-256. Topic: Design for the Web. Methods and principles for effective communication through the World Wide Web. Separation of content and format, organization that helps authors and readers, integration of text and images, and coordination of the dialog between machine and human being. Students will design, build, test, and present their own Web sites. The instructor would like to help students in all majors learn how to use an important and still young medium in their own work. TABAK

    9-257. Topic: Geographical Information Systems. Representation, analysis, and visualization of spatial data for applications in the natural and social sciences. Survey of current standards, available tools, significant achievements, and potential for the future development of the technology. Implications for public policy. Students will learn to use GIS software for the solution of problems related to their own major fields of interest. TABAK

    6-358. Advanced Topic: Software Applications for the Web. Design of software that includes components that execute on clients' machines and on remote servers, facilitate communication between clients and servers, and respond to clients' requests by querying databases. Identification of special challenges that arise in the development of applications for the Web. How to meet demands for scalability, reliability, performance, and security. Characteristics of the most successful applications for the Web. Prerequisites: CSC 140 and CSC 151. TABAK

    4-359. Advanced Topic: Robotics. Discusses the field of robotics, with an emphasis on designing and building small vehicles based on the VeX system that can explore and learn about the environment around them without human guidance.  This will be a project-centered class, with early projects being simple tasks such as processing input from sensors and navigating mazes, and involving a large student-chosen open-ended project.  Specific topics will include basic artificial intelligence, building and using sensors to make reliable measurements in the real world, and controlling systems in real-time based on those measurements. Prerequisites: CSC 213, and either CSC 218 or CSC 302. WILDENBERG

ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS

    3-272. Topic: Health Care Financing Mechanisms. Examination of the financing of the current U.S. health care system, including government programs, employer sponsored programs, and the individual insurance market. The U.S. system will also be compared to the health care delivery systems of other countries. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or intructor's permission. CONRAD

    5-273. Topic: Introduction to Financial Management. Topics include asset valuation, market efficiency, discounted cash flows, risk and return analysis, bond and stock valuation, cost of capital, and choosing between competing projects. CONRAD

    EDUCATION

    8-205. Foundations of Education (in Greece). In many ways, we in the western world can trace our educational genealogy back to the Ancient Greeks, whose ideas about the importance of what today we call “liberal education” laid the foundation for many of the grounding principles of K-12 education and college education. This class will begin on campus, studying the Ancient Greek ideas about liberal education and Renaissance and Modern revivals of Greek ideals in an effort to trace the thread of Greek thought and influence over the course of the past two and a half millennia. We will then travel to Greece for a two-week stay in order to explore ancient ruins that will provide us with a deeper understanding of the artistic, political, and philosophical culture that is the base of modern educational ideas -- and that continues to inspire both great awe and great criticism today. During our time in Greece, we will both visit great sites, such as the Parthenon and Delphi and read Greek authors that have long been considered foundational texts of liberal arts education. This course fulfils the EDU 205 requirement for the Education major, but it will not focus on public school education as do most other EDU 205 courses. Non-majors are especially encouraged to register for the course. Additional fees required. Prerequisite: approved application (available in the Office of Off-Campus Study, Room 112, College Hall). Applications are due by March 3. Students will be notified before March 7 (the final day to turn in registration cards) of whether they have been admitted to the course. (Humanities) MACKLER

    2-260. Topic: Policy to Practice: Comparative Educational Systems, the United States and southern Africa (in Southern Africa). The development of the education system in the U.S. has taken place for over 200 years, while the work for a similar system in Namibia has only been in effect for the past seventeen. In this course, you will examine the educational systems of the U.S. and southern Africa while reflecting on your own personal schooling and experiencing the differences in culture between the two regions. Topics explored in this course will focus on language, lower primary education policy and policies regarding special education. Visits to schools in Namibia and South Africa combined with personal interactions with teachers, students, and homestay families will provide students with the ability to analyze the influence of culture and society on the different educational systems. Students will develop a research paper relating to educational policy comparisons between southern Africa and the U.S. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. (Social Science) LUCK

    ENGLISH

    1-111. Topic: After Hamlet. Hamlet, the second most written-about text in Western literature after the Bible, is an elusive entity. Based on an older Scandinavian myth and perhaps a lost play, it has come down to us in no less than three seventeenth-century texts that present today’s editors, readers, and theatre professionals with a host of interpretive questions. This introductory writing class begins by investigating some of the major interpretive puzzles and possibilities through a reading of Shakespeare’s “basic” texts. We then study several film and theatre adaptations of Shakespeare’s play and the interpretive choices of their creative teams. Finally, we will discuss other writers’ creative adaptations, which re-interpret the characters and conflicts in Hamlet in daring and imaginative ways. Through discussion and daily writing assignments, you will develop your analytical and research skills and acquire some of the fundamental vocabulary for literary analysis. A research assignment will introduce you to the library resources and to research techniques in the field of literary studies. To perfect your writing skills and master the art of revision, you will keep a writer’s journal, use it to draft and revise three formal papers, and generate a final project based on two of these papers. Not open to students who have previously completed ENG 111. (Humanities, Writing Requirement) STAVREVA

    2-111. Topic: “Knowledge,” “Culture,” and the Liberal Arts. How is an academic field defined? Are such divisions “natural” or do they reflect cultural biases? How is knowledge generated and developed? This course will examine the ways in which the liberal arts intersect with, and shape, cultural formations. We will use the idea of art in general, and literature more specifically, as a lens to explore the nature of the liberal arts as a whole. We will read literary, aesthetic, cultural, and political theory in an attempt to answer for ourselves what a college education is for. What is higher education’s role in a democratic society? How should it serve both individuals and society? This course should give you the background and the critical eye to question and to make use of your experiences at Cornell and beyond. Not open to students who have previously completed ENG 111. (Humanities, Writing Requirement) G. FREEMAN

    3-111-A. Topic: Victorian Gothic: The Legend, Life, and Literature of the Bronte Sisters. A study of the legendary lives and literature of Charlotte, Emily, Anne, and Branwell Bronte. Readings may include Jane Eyre, Wuthering Heights, and Agnes Grey. The course is also an introduction to writing at the college level. Students will draft and revise several papers, and participate in academic writing workshops. Not open to students who have previously completed ENG 111. (Humanities, Writing Requirement) MOUTON

    3-111-B. Topic: Something Wicked This Way Comes: Monsters in Film and Literature. Since the beginning of written history, monsters have represented our cultural dark sides. They pervade our literature, our art, and our imaginations. But what does it mean to be a monster? How have our notions of monsters--from vampires to zombies to werewolves--changed over time? In this course, we will examine how monsters function in film and literature, and how the definition of "monstrous" has shifted as fears change and evolve. Emphasis will be placed on critical reading, academic writing, research, and revision. Students will complete several writing assignments, including a research project. Not open to students who have previously completed ENG 111. (Humanities, Writing Requirement) JACKSON

    4-111-A. Topic: From Esther to Elizabeth I: Queens in Sacred Writings, Literature, and Film. Savvy political power brokers and symbols of patriarchal power or male political alliances, sexualized entrancesses and skillful negotiators, she-wolves and saintly wives to the nation, defenders of their honor, their love, their nation, their faith: from the ancient Hebrews to today’s cinematic audiences, queens have captured the imagination of story-tellers, writers, and visual artists. In this introductory writing course, we will study the representations of historical and mythologized women rulers in the Hebrew Bible, Renaissance and Romantic literature, and contemporary film--women such as Esther and Vashti, Isabella and Elizabeth I of England, the two Marguerites of Navarre (aunt and niece), and Catherine de Medici. Through writing and class discussions of chapters from the Hebrew Bible, Renaissance drama and narrative fiction, Romantic novel, and contemporary historical film, you will hone your analytical and critical reading skills. A research assignment will introduce you to the library resources and to research techniques in the field of literary and cultural studies. The course will involve daily writing and will give you multiple opportunities to reflect on the writing process and engage in writing revision. Not open to students who have previously completed ENG 111. (Humanities, Writing Requirement) STAVREVA

    4-111-B. Topic: Science, Fiction, and Culture (linked with PHY 1-125). In PHY 125, students will use science fiction to explore the connection between science and the imagination, between science and creative thinking. In this course, students will continue their work, but we will explore the connections between science fiction as literature and the imagination. The physicist Amit Goswami suggests that “Science Fiction is that class of fiction which contains the currents of change in science and society. It concerns itself with the critique, extension, revision, and conspiracy of revolution, all directed against static scientific paradigms. Its goal is to prompt a paradigm shift to a new view that will be more responsive and true to nature.” Science fiction imagines different futures, impossible technologies, or unlikely encounters (with aliens, artificial intelligence, and so on) to invite readers to shift to that “new view” about almost any topic: gender, human existence, consequences of action or inaction. This course will read several short stories, a few novels and some critical articles to help us understand what science fiction, how it works, and how it uses imagination differently than other forms of fiction. We might also, in the true spirit of science fictional inquiry, entertain ideas about what literature is, how it works in the world, and how it is created. This course fulfills the writing requirement and so includes an emphasis on critical reading, writing and revision. Some attention paid to writing style as well. Students will write and revise several papers and complete a research project which includes a short creative piece. Not open to students who have previously completed ENG 111. (Humanities, Writing Requirement) REED

    5-111-A. Topic: The Fictions of Racial Identity. A slave dresses as her white owner, and her husband poses as her slave; together they escape to freedom. A slave mother switches her own child with her owner's child, and her son is raised as heir of the house. This course will examine stories such as these to consider how people "pass" from one racial identity to another. Through the literature of passing, we will interrogate the reasons people pass, the anxieties surrounding passing, and the consequences when passers are exposed. We will focus on how racial identity is constructed personally, socially, legally, and scientifically. This literature course will emphasize critical thinking, reading, and writing skills and will introduce students to conventions of academic research. Students will be fully immersed in the writing and revision process through multiple writing assignments and workshops. Not open to students who have previously completed ENG 111. (Humanities, Writing Requirement) ENTEL

    5-111-B. Topic: The Cultural Uses of Censorship and Literature. The history of censorship is long and varied, but what induces people to censor literature and film? Beginning with the banishment of poets from Plato’s Republic, this course examines discussions and justifications of censorship. Specifically, it asks why people find some fiction so threatening that they ban, burn, edit or in other ways attempt to control the texts, or the writers. In addition to Plato, we will read John Milton’s Areopagitica, writings by Salman Rushdie and J. M. Coetzee, as well as works that have been censored. Emphasis on critical reading, writing and revision. Some attention also given to writing style. Not open to students who have previously completed ENG 111. (Humanities, Writing Requirement) REED

    6-111. Topic: On Being Ill: Patient/Doctor Dynamics in Film and Fiction. Virginia Woolf knew her doctors. Her novel, Mrs. Dalloway, is, among other things, a scathing indictment of the medical system and its treatment of WWI veterans with shellshock. Yet, Woolf also wrote a dazzling celebration of the creative potential of illness in her long essay, “On Being Ill.” We will begin with Woolf’s treatment of doctors and illness and also examine depictions by other writers and filmmakers. What are some of the salient dynamics of the patient/doctor dynamic? How do fiction and film encourage us to accept and/or to re-examine them? What power structures are apparent in medical dynamics? If you are considering a medical career, this course may provide an opportunity to reflect upon such roles. In addition to readings, the course may incorporate speakers from within and without the medical system. All of this will be the backdrop for intense attention to writing critically, intelligently and regularly in papers from the essay to the research project. In class, in research, and in papers, we will study and theorize about the patient/doctor dance. Students will draft and redraft writings, from in class writing to critical essays to research-informed critical projects. Students will learn how to search for literary and cultural scholarship, using library resources such as search engines and data bases. Challenging writing assignments will help develop critical thinking and critical writing skills. Not open to students who have previously completed ENG 111. (Humanities, Writing Requirement) HANKINS

    7-111-A. Topic: Site-Writing and Light-Writing: Journaling, Journeying, Walking, Writing and Photography. How can we relate site-seeking, sight-seeing, insight writing, and writing in light (photography)? What about journeying and journaling? Writing and walking? Wilderness sites, cityscapes, and others will be part of the trek of this course. We’ll read the rich nature/wilderness journals of Dorothy Wordsworth (Lake Country England) and Emily Carr (painter, British Columbia) and essays by Virginia Woolf (“Street-Haunting: a London Adventure” and others). We’ll study the modernist/wilderness paintings of Emily Carr and works by nature photographers such as Imogen Cunningham and Ansel Adams and read what they write about their art. And, we’ll do solo and group field trips to scenic downtown Mount Vernon and the Palisades and create journals in words and photographs. All of this will be the backdrop for intense attention to writing critically, intelligently and regularly in papers from the essay to the research project. In class, in research, and in papers, we will study and theorize about journaling, photography, and insights in sites. Students will draft and redraft writings, from in class writing to critical essays to research-informed critical projects. Students will learn how to search for literary and cultural scholarship, using library resources such as search engines and data bases. Challenging writing assignments will help develop critical thinking and critical writing skills. Not open to students who have previously completed ENG 111. (Humanities, Writing Requirement) HANKINS

    7-111-B. Topic: Victorian Gothic: The Legend, Life, and Literature of the Bronte Sisters. See term 3 for description. Not open to students who have previously completed ENG 111. (Humanities, Writing Requirement) MOUTON

    8-111. Topic: The Fictions of Racial Identity. See term 5 for description. Not open to students who have previously completed ENG 111. (Humanities, Writing Requirement) ENTEL

    9-111. Topic: “Knowledge,” “Culture,” and the Liberal Arts. See term 2 for description. Not open to students who have previously completed ENG 111. (Humanities, Writing Requirement) G. FREEMAN

    7-319. Advanced Critical Writing. Advanced course in academic writing. In discussion, intensive workshops, and individual instruction, students will critically read and evaluate their own work and the work of their peers, as well as professional academic writers. In addition to writing several papers, students will substantially revise and expand the research for a paper they have written for a previous course. Students must bring to class on the first day a short paper they are prepared to further research and revise. The course will also give considerable attention to advanced information literacy and advanced writing style. This course is especially appropriate for students who intend to pursue graduate study or careers with a strong writing component. Prerequisites: writing-designated course (W) and junior standing. Alternate years. REED

    8-322. Medieval and Renaissance Drama: Shakespeare’s Rivals (at the Newberry Library, Chicago). In this undergraduate research seminar, you will study the drama of Shakespeare’s contemporaries and rivals—Marlowe, Middleton, Dekker, Ford, or Webster—within the context of the highly theatrical culture of early modern England. You will have the opportunity to carry out original archival research in the Rare Book collections of the Newberry Library in Chicago, participate in the Newberry’s welcoming community of scholars, and take advantage of Chicago’s dynamic theater- and cultural scene to bring the readings to life. The course will also serve as an introduction to historicist literary criticism, enabling you to approach your final research project in a theoretically informed manner. Registration entails additional fees. Prerequisite: writing-designated course (W). (Humanities) STAVREVA

    1-347. Modern American Literature: Encountering the Wilderness, American Literature and Photography (Wilderness Field Station, Minnesota). From Thoreau to Hemingway, from the f/64 group of wilderness photographers to the contemporary wolf/wilderness photographer Jim Brandenberg, encounters with the wild have shaped American art and culture. What better way to study those encounters than within the wilderness that inspired the writers and photographers? Therefore, the class will journey to the Boundary Waters of Minnesota, to the Coe College Wilderness Field Station, where we will immerse ourselves in the glorious September outdoors, study journals, literature and photography and consider the interplay between our own encounters with the wilderness and the artworks about the wilderness that we study. The course will reflect upon art and meditation as ways of relating to the wilderness. To capture our own responses to the wilderness, we will keep journals/portfolios of projects involving writing, literary analysis, meditation, and photography (including a one-photo-a-day project inspired by Brandenberg’s works). The class will study photographers Ansel Adams, Imogen Cunningham and others who created art from their encounters with the wilderness. We will study Thoreau’s foundational essays from Walden and the vibrant journals and paintings of Emily Carr, the Canadian wilderness writer and painter of the first half of the 20th century. We’ll read fiction and essays by a variety of American writers and discuss them over campfires and dinners, and by the lake. While at the Wilderness Field Station, depending on the class size and staff availability, we may do a canoe trip and camp for a few days at compelling sites of the Boundary Waters Canoe Area, or we will stay at the Field Station on lovely Low Lake and do day trips. You may be a seasoned camper, a neophyte, or something in between, but the class will all work together to make the course and our trip, memorable. We may learn to portage, canoe, recognize trees and wolf scat and flora and fauna of the area as we interact with other courses at the Field Station for the Cornell Wilderness Term. The Field Station is primitive, rustic, and rather raw. Be ready to embrace the absence of electricity, laptops, cellphones, and iPods. But it is a worthwhile trade, because you gain breathtaking beauty, stunning silence, physical challenges of hoisting and canoeing, and moments of sublime revelation—plus camaraderie. (“Wake up! Are those wolves howling?! There must be fifty of them!”) Registration entails additional costs. Prerequisite: writing-designated course (W). (Humanities) HANKINS

    2-374. Advanced Topic: Southern African Art, Literature, and Culture in Context. “Some have described Africa as the last frontier. I hesitate to use the term, for it may conjure the need for gung ho horsemen, ready to lasso it to order. However, it accurately describes the knowledge divide, which separates the developed world from the developing, and is most manifested in the digital divide. Only education can narrow this divide. Education on the Continent. . . and education about the continent. . ." His Excellency Dr. Richard Sezibera,
    Ambassador of The Republic of Rwanda

    Dr. Sezibera’s words call on those of us in the developing world to cross that divide. This course provides us with the opportunity to begin to understand southern Africa through its literature, art, and theater. In South Africa and Namibia, we will read contemporary southern African literature, meet its writers, and visit museums and galleries. We’ll have the chance to do homestays in Soweto, South Africa, and study with university students in Windhoek, Namibia. We’ll ask questions: what does it mean to be a writer or an artist in countries still dealing with the legacies of apartheid and colonialism? what role do the arts play in building a new nation and new national identity? and how do these art forms speak to us? Occasionally we’ll play tourist, taking a moment to visit the Cape of Good Hope (stopping to visit the penguins in Simon’s Town) in South Africa and a tour of Etosha Game Reserve in Namibia. Course entails additional costs. For more information, contact Shannon Reed. Prerequisites: writing-designated course and sophomore standing. (Humanities) REED

    9-381. Advanced Topic: Distinguished Visiting Poet Seminar: Representing Bodies. In this course, we will examine the political and ethical ramifications of representing bodies (our own included), particularly bodies in pain (though also bodies in love and bodies at rest), in poetry. As such, the course will be framed with a few theoretical texts—excerpts from Elaine Scarry's "The Body in Pain," Susan Sontag's "Regarding the Pain of Others," and Sadiya Hartman's "Scenes of Subjection"—in addition to the work of several poets. We will be writing and workshopping poems composed in the midst of, and in conversation with, the ideas generated by these texts and our discussions of them. The class will be about half discussion of these texts and half workshop. Prerequisites: writing-designated course (W). (Fine Arts) GAY

    7-382. Advanced Topic in Creative or Media Writing: Distinguished Visiting Feature Writer Seminar. Want a ticket to lifelong learning? In this course, you will learn the craft of feature writing, which, unlike straight news reporting, allows the author more creativity to tell stories. Feature writing starts with, first and foremost, finding and having good ideas; it depends on fundamentals that turn these ideas into articles appealing to audiences. Through listening, reading, research, reporting, and, of course, writing, you will be encouraged to stretch your thinking. We will hone these skills and apply them inside and outside the classroom. There will be opportunities to get work published. The ultimate goal is that you improve your writing, a benefit throughout life whether it is applied to professional journalism, newsletter writing, journaling, or other forms of communication requiring analytical skills developed in this class. Prerequisite: writing-designated course (W). (Humanities) CONKLIN

    1-411. Senior Seminar: Colonial Literature and Postcolonial Theory, or The Strange but Surprisingly True Adventures of Eighteenth-Century Literature, together with an account of its humble origins in England and its subsequent travels around the world. Advanced, theoretically informed engagement with literary studies, broadly defined, including reflection on what the English major brings to intellectual and creative life beyond the undergraduate years. The scholarly focus will be on eighteenth-century literature (especially fiction) and postcolonial adaptations and responses to that literature. We will read some postcolonial literature and theory in addition to eighteenth-century specimens. How did writers in the eighteenth century conceive of and interact with the larger world? Why have those conceptions continued to intrigue and occupy writers in formerly colonized countries today? Students will initiate research projects, and will reflect on the place of literature in life beyond the English major. Prerequisites: English major and senior standing. (Humanities) REED

    5-411. Senior Seminar: Literary Appropriation, Politics, and Cultural Knowledge. Advanced, theoretically informed engagement with literary studies, broadly defined, including reflection on what the English major brings to intellectual and creative life beyond the undergraduate years. The scholarly focus will be on writers’ and performers’ appropriation of influential literary texts to make sense of the past, shape cultural knowledge about the present, and impact the future. We will start with the changes in genre, content, and politics introduced by Renaissance playwrights Marlowe and Shakespeare to classical epic narratives, then read feminist “re-visions,” postcolonial “writing back” and postmodern “counter-discourses” that have adapted the work of these Renaissance authors. We will discuss theories of adaptation, intertextuality, and performance as well as literary texts, theater performances, and films. Collaborating in teams, students will develop publication proposals for book anthologies or hyper-text archives on the precursors and afterlife of a literary text of their choice—a text they believe resonates strongly with current and/or emerging ethical, political, epistemological, or cultural concerns. In addition, each member will contribute a research essay that could feature in a substantive editorial introduction to the anthology. Prerequisites: English major and senior standing. (Humanities) STAVREVA

    FRENCH

    6-261. Topic: Environmental Issues. Recommended for students interested in Environmental Studies and everyone else, this introduction to Environmental Studies addresses the breadth of environmental issues and represents a novel classroom model. While professors Freeman and McCollum will provide the day to day continuity to the course, a number of faculty from other departments will visit to lead discussions and bring out the finer points of issues from their disciplinary perspective. The course will be organized around one or a few themes. One such theme is salmon fisheries. Most of us eat fish, which is still mostly harvested from the wild by fishermen. But what are the environmental issues associated with our patterns of harvest and consumption of these natural resources? Faculty from geology, biology, chemistry, philosophy, sociology, politics and economics can all provide perspectives on fisheries of the Pacific Northwest. The course is not a fisheries course; we will explore environmental issues such as food and agriculture, pollution, climate change, population growth, waste, energy and loss of biodiversity from the perspectives of science, politics, ethics, arts and literature, economics and social justice. Our goal is to introduce students to the diverse connections that many disciplines have to environmental issues and the contributions that each can bring to complex environmental issues. G. FREEMAN/McCOLLUM

    GEOLOGY

    REL 9-366. Advanced Topic: Islam and Postcoloniality in Contemporary Morocco (in Morocco). This course will focus on the role of Islam in post-colonial politics and culture in Northern Africa. Students will visit religious and historical sites, meet scholars and students, and study literary and religious textual sources. The course will take place in Fez, Morocco and will require additional costs. This course may be counted as a 300-level French course for the French major or minor. Students who wish to receive French credit for the course will be required to get prior approval from the French department and will complete a significant amount of their coursework in French. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. (Humanities) BATY/SACKS [CM]

    HISTORY

    9-223. Geology of the National Parks (Washington). Washington State—land of spectacular mountains, massive volcanoes, rugged coastlines, and steep river gorges—is one of the best places in the United States to witness and study the dramatic results of active tectonics. This course will include a fieldtrip lasting approximately two weeks, during which we will plan to visit Olympic National Park (mountains and coast), Mt. Rainier, Mt. St. Helens, the Columbia River Gorge, and possibly the Channelized Scablands (the result of monstrous glacial floods) or the North Cascades National Park. We will camp and spend much of our time hiking and exploring the vastly differing geology of these parks, learning also about specific issues (policy, environmental, social, etc.) that face these parks. Prerequisite: GEO 111 or 114. (Laboratory Science) WALSH

    KINESIOLOGY

    3-118. Introductory Seminar: Growing Up Crazy: From Flappers to Flower Children (The Rise and Fall of Youth Culture). In both the 1920s and 1960s youth rebelled against the prevailing culture with the creation of a subculture that challenges the values of the dominant culture. The stress and tensions of each period will be examined in this course with an interest in similarities and differences. The elements of what is called “youth or counter culture” will be evaluated in terms of any lasting contributions to American life in the twenty-first century. Each decade will be studied in the historical context and the new original contributions of the new music, language, interpersonal relations and politics. The role of popular film, recording technologies and college life are subjects for investigation. Special attention will center on what prompted the rise of and what curtailed this burst of preoccupation on the young and the future of American life.

    The course is intended to introduce new students to the range of issues addressed by the study of American history and the various themes and resources that contribute to our understanding of the past. Elements of popular culture are mixed with the use of traditional sources for writing history. Class participation, a mid-term exam, and research paper are required. (Humanities)
    R. THOMAS

    4-333. Advanced Topic: The Crusades. This course approaches the history of the crusades in the context of the relations between Europe and Islam since the seventh century. With the help of some spectacular sources, including the memoirs of an Arabic knight, we will examine how the crusade was experienced in Western Europe and the Near East. Special attention will be paid to the crusades as an early and formative stage of European colonialism. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. (Humanities) EPURESCU-PASCOVICI

    7-334. Advanced Topic: National Identity, Community, and Race in the Middle Ages. As the traditional view of the Middle Ages as a hierarchical system - 'feudalism' - came under more critical scrutiny in the last two decades, scholars have highlighted the role of other binding forces in medieval society, such as communal identity, ethnicity, and race. This course will explore some of the rich medieval literature on these topics, with an eye to the development of national identity in Europe. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. (Humanities) EPURESCU-PASCOVICI

    1-356. African Americans in U.S. History. The focus of this course will be on slavery in the American colonies and the United States. Prerequisite: junior standing. (Humanities) LUCAS

    5-357. Seminar: Abraham Lincoln. An examination of Abraham Lincoln's political career and this accomplishments as president. Topics covered will include Lincoln's rise to prominence, his handling of the slavery issues, and his role as commander in chief during the Civil War. Prerequisite: junior standing. Not available to students who have taken HIS 353. (Humanities) LUCAS

    LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES

    9-101. Fitness for Life: Outdoor Activities. Instruction in the major components of fitness, the physiological basis of fitness, evaluation of personal fitness, and individual fitness programming. The activities component of the course includes instruction and practice in hiking, trailing running, and wilderness camping and canoeing, culminating in a week-long excursion in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness in northeastern Minnesota. A course fee of approximately $300 is required to pay transportation and complete outfitting costs for the trip. MEEKER

    3-255. Topic: History of Women's Sports. Exploration of the historical development of women's sports experience from primitive cultures to contemporary American society. Special focus on growth of sports in the U.S. and significant influential events. WHALE

    MUSIC

    5-235. Topic: Latin America through Film. This course is an introduction to Latin American cinema through the studies of its film production and film theory, emphasizing themes such as conquest, poverty, political turmoil, identity, migration, and gender. A survey of films from Cuba, Brazil, the U.S., Mexico, Argentina, and Chile will provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the cinematic depictions about Latin America (from Latin American and American directors). Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. (Humanities) OCHOA-SHIVAPOUR

    6-273. Topic: Who Owns Music? The Practice and Politics of Musical Borrowing. This course will examine the broad concept of musical composition based on pre-existing material. We will consider the many different borrowing techniques that composers have used (such as parody, quotation, sampling, etc.), the many different reasons composers have had for using borrowed material, and the many different cultural and historical attitudes towards borrowing ranging from veneration and admiration to accusations of unoriginality, plagiarism, and even immorality. (Humanities) STILWELL

PHILOSOPHY

    7-363. Advanced Topic: Idealism. Advanced study of the philosophical movement of idealism and its critics. Examination of such figures as Plato, Berkeley, Kant and Hegel and the influence of such views on later philosophy. Prerequisites: PHI 111 and sophomore standing. (Humanities) MIGELY

POLITICS

    2-250. Principles of Advocacy. An overview of the United States legal system with an emphasis on the adversarial approach to resolution of conflicts and controversies in federal, state, and local tribunals as well as in alternate forums and venues. Students will gain a general understanding of the roles of the various participants with primary focus on the role of the lawyer as advocate. The course will incorporate aspirational and ethical considerations, practical issues faced by trial attorneys, and the potential for fulfillment and disillusionment fighting the battles of others. (Social Science) HEDGES

    3-332. Human Rights. Practices and characteristics of governments and non-governmental actors that abuse and protect human rights, history of the concept and treatment of rights, justifications for the protection of rights, differences between categories of rights, prospects for the improved protection of rights through international and domestic action. Prerequisite: junior standing. Alternate years. (Social Science) YAMANISHI

    7-333. Global Governance. History, present characteristics, and future prospects of efforts to establish international order through global and regional integration and governance, the development of international law, the activity of internationally-oriented non-state actors and social movements, and resistance thereto. Prerequisite: POL 242. Alternate years. (Social Science) YAMANISHI

    4-336. Seminar: Strategies to Alleviate Poverty. The course explores the nature of poverty in the developing world. What causes it? What behaviors does it induce? Emphasis is on discussing various institutional factors that lead to poverty. The course will explore strategies and programs designed to alleviate poverty at the international, national and local levels, and analyze the role of the World Bank, national governments and non-governmental organizations in eliminating poverty. Can poverty be eradicated and if so, can the solution be found in capitalism itself? If not, is there a viable alternative? Prerequisite: POL 242 or 243. (Social Science) A. THOMAS

    CANCELLED 4-352. Advanced Topic: Economic Regulation in the U.S. An examination of regulatory policymaking and policies in the United States, this course will review the development of regulatory policies in the American federal system and consider theories about the formulation, analysis, and evaluation of regulations affecting economic activities. Students will produce case study analyses of specific regulatory policies or programs at the local, state, or federal level of U.S. government. Prerequisite: POL 242, 243, 262, or 282. (Social Science) GODEK

PSYCHOLOGY

    8-257. Topic: Cultural Competence: Melting Pots and Salad Bowls. An exploration of the diversity of cultural and ethnic behaviors, attitudes and values; how cultural sensitivity, awareness, and knowledge differ from competence. Survey of research and interventions aimed at increasing cultural competence specifically within the healthcare setting. (Social Science) BUSHA

    7-372. Cognition, Evolution, and Behavior. An examination of cognitive and adaptive processes in learning. The course will cover fundamental principles of learning. However, the primary focus will be on how cognitive processes, such as the perception of regularities in the environment and memory, affect learning. In addition, the course will examine the role of adaptive processes in shaping learning capabilities in various species of organisms. Prerequisites: PSY 161 and any 200-level Psychology course. (Social Science) ASTLEY

    5-377. Abnormal Child/Adolescent Psychology. A survey of emotional and behavioral disorders in children and adolescents, including the description of various behaviors, symptoms, syndromes, and disorders as well as research on child and adolescent disorders. The course explores multiple developmental pathways of children and adolescents as well as risks and protective factors that may influence the likelihood of developing a disorder. The course also addresses why and under what conditions disorders persist into adulthood. Prerequisites: PSY 161 and any 200-level Psychology course. (Social Science) JANSSENS-RUD

    8-383. Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine. Mind and body are inextricably linked, interacting in complex ways to contribute jointly to illness, disease, health, and well-being. Thus, the study of the mind (i.e., Psychology) has been integrated with the study of physical health (i.e., Medicine) to create the closely related fields of Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine. The purpose of this course is two-fold: 1) to comprehend and integrate psychological and biomedical knowledge in order to better understand health and illness, and 2) to examine social and behavioral aspects that contribute to physical health and well-being. Prerequisites: PSY 161 any 200-level Psychology course. (Social Science) GREEN

    7-395. Human Services Practicum and Seminar. Supervised full-time internship in a human service context and a weekly seminar. Group discussions of current issues in the field such as cultural and gender diversity, ethics, professional practice challenges, and the role of research in practice. Students must provide their own transportation. Prerequisites: three Psychology courses, declared psychology major, and junior standing. (CR) JANSSENS-RUD

RELIGION

    2-266. Topic: Biblical Hebrew. Introduction to classical Biblical Hebrew, with an emphasis on grammatical proficiency and sensitivity to the literary expression of the Bible. The course will provide the student with skills to read exemplary selections from the Hebrew Bible, and familiarity with the various genres of Biblical literature. (Humanities) SACKS [JS]

    9-366. Advanced Topic: Islam and Postcoloniality in Contemporary Morocco (in Morocco). This course will focus on the role of Islam in post-colonial politics and culture in Northern Africa. Students will visit religious and historical sites, meet scholars and students, and study literary and religious textual sources. The course will take place in Fez, Morocco and will require additional costs. This course may be counted as a 300-level French course for the French major or minor. Students who wish to receive French credit for the course will be required to get prior approval from the French department and will complete a significant amount of their coursework in French. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. (Humanities) BATY/SACKS [CM]

RUSSIAN

    9-355. Russian Literature and Film, 1932-Present. This course, conducted in English, will focus on major trends in film and literature and discuss a variety of works from the Soviet and post-Soviet periods. Literary texts will include Solzhenitsyn’s One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich, Bulgakov’s The Master and Margarita, and Pasternak’s Doctor Zhivago. Offered every third year. Prerequisite: Writing-designated course (W). (Humanities) IKACH

SOCIOLOGY

    9-352. Advanced Topic: Wealth, Power, and Inequality. Emphasizes the importance of socio-economic class by exploring the meaning and measurement of social class, how social classes are formed, and how they change. This course explores issues of social mobility, investigates the relationship between various forms of inequality (i.e., social class, race-ethnicity, gender, sexuality) and contemplates the role of culture and social institutions, (e.g., work, the health care system, schools, families, the political systems, etc.) in perpetuating, legitimizing, and sometimes challenging social inequality. Prerequisite: SOC 101. (Social Science) BARNES-BRUS [Hierarchy]

    6-360. Advanced Topic: Reproductive Processes, Reproductive Policies. This course emphasizes the social construction of female reproductive processes and how culture and institutions shape our understandings and expectations of such processes. This course introduces topics pertaining to a variety of reproductive practices, experiences and ideologies and explores issues from social reproduction and birth control to menstruation and the construction of fetal personhood in order to shed light on the social and constructed nature of reproductive strategies, and practices. We will discuss ideas about womanhood, motherhood, fatherhood, sexuality, eugenics, and reproductive freedom, as well as uncover the historical role and effect of the state, medical institutions, and women themselves as they struggle over, and shape such issues. The focus will be on the U.S., but we will also look at cases from other countries in order to examine our assumptions about reproductive practices and strategies. Prerequisite: SOC 101. BARNES-BRUS [Identity]

    5-367. Self and Identity. This course examines the construction, negotiation, and representation of the self and social identities. We will discuss differing theoretical approaches to understanding identity, explore the tensions and conflicts of identification, and investigate the relations between social identities, groups, cultures, and institutions. Identities, cultures, and social movements developed around sexuality, gender, race/ethnicity, disability and other social statuses are examined. Prerequisite: SOC 101. Alternate years. (Social Science) DAVIS [Identity]

THEATRE

    7-260. Topic: Advanced Scene Study. A more advanced study of the work of the actor building on the techniques learned in Basic and Advanced Acting. This class will focus on scene work and scene study through the use of “heightened language” playwrights (Euripides, Sophocles, Shakespeare, Moliere, Ibsen, Chekhov, Shaw, O’Neill, Williams, Mamet, etc.). Students will be required to present three scenes (chosen by the instructor) accompanied by a character analysis for each. A journal will be kept. Prerequisite: THE 215. (Fine Arts) VANVALEN

    1-262. Topic: Advanced Costume Construction: Clothing and Undergarments of the Neoclassical Age. The course teaches advanced sewing and construction techniques, leading to the completion of realized garments for the Department of Theatre's production of "Les Liaisons Dangereuses". In addition to clothing, the course will focus on corsets, panniers, and petticoats and the historical development of undergarments in this era. Prerequisite: THE 108. (Fine Arts) KELCHEN

    3-370. Advanced Topic: Contemporary Theatre (in New York). This course offers a critical look at contemporary theatre and performance practice, as exemplified by the traditionally vital theatre scene in New York City. Approximately 2-1/2 weeks of the course will be spent in New York, attending and responding to a variety of performance events that range from Broadway shows and Off Broadway productions to performance art pieces in small galleries and experimental work. It is likely that students will also attend some dance events and a variety of art museums and galleries. The course will satisfy one of the theatre history and criticism credits required for the theatre major. Entails additional costs. Prerequisite: writing-designated course (W). (Humanities) OLINGER

    9-371. Advanced Topic: Contemporary Drama. This course in contemporary playwriting focuses on selected playtexts written after the mid 20th century.  It is intended to survey the range of contemporary dramaturgy, emphasizing plays acclaimed for their quality and influential impact on other writers. Prerequisite: writing-designated course (W). (Humanities) STAFF

    8-372. Advanced Topic: Master Works of Dramatic Literature. This course in dramatic literature examines a select group of playtexts that are acknowledged masterpieces and which have been especially influential in theatre history. Plays studied may include ancient Greek, early modern, Elizabethan, and Restoration comedy texts, as well as an assortment of 19th and early 20th century classics. Prerequisite: writing-designated course (W). (Humanities) HUNTER

    2-379. Advanced Topic: Introduction to Performance Studies. Performance Studies has emerged as a still-evolving academic discipline that studies human behavior across a broad contextual spectrum, including ritual, play, popular entertainment, the performing arts, sport, and everyday life performances. This course serves as an introduction to this new field of scholarship and its cross-disciplinary influences: theatre studies, sociology, anthropology, post-structuralism, ritual theory, ethology, and philosophy. Prerequisite: writing-designated course (W). (Humanities) HUNTER

WOMEN'S STUDIES

    2-257. Topic: Women Make Their Mark: The Feminist Politics of Body Art. The 1960s and 1970s were decades of enormous rebellion and change. Women were involved in both public and private battles to explore and expose traditional assumptions about gender, race, class, and especially sexuality. Women artists used their bodies to challenge the prevailing ideology of the time. This course will examine and discuss the provocative body artwork created and performed by women artists primarily during the 1960s and 1970s. This course will be conducted as a workshop, will include several in-depth assigned readings, viewing videos and slides pertaining to this work, several response papers, and projects involving using your own body as art. DYAS

    4-260. Topic: Thinking Sexualities: A Survey of Lesbian/Gay/Bisexual/
    Transgendered and Queer Studies.
    This course will examine the development of sexuality studies from the homophile movement of the 1950s, through the Gay Liberation period following the Stonewall Riots of 1969, the rise of Lesbigay studies in the 1970s and 1980s, and the debate over theory and politics caused by the introduction of Queer theory in the 1990s through today. CROWDER

    7-302. Advanced Topic: Global Feminisms. An inquiry into issues that have become part of the global agenda for women over the last three decades, the individuals, groups, and policies that have shaped this agenda, and the environment in which global feminisms are forged. Includes issues such as the influence of globalization and the role of state and international agencies, and explores varied expressions of women's activism at the local, national, and transnational levels. Prerequisite: WST 171. A. THOMAS