A Supplementary Catalogue listing all permanent changes to the curriculum made since the publication of the 2002-2004 Catalogue. This version of deTERMinations is for the 2002-2003 academic year.

April 30, 2003
(The updates below are correct as of this date.)


CHANGES TO THE AUGUST 2002-03 TERM TABLE (changes marked in bold):


ADD ART 7-103 Drawing I COLEMAN
CANCEL
BIO 4-108 Topic: Insect Fact and Folklore
ADD
BIO 4-142 Foundations: Organismal Biology McCOLLUM
CANCEL BIO 6-230 Conservation Biology
BIO 5-329 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (was BIO 5-385)
CLA 3-372 Epic Tradition WILL
CSC 5-355. Advanced Topics in Computer Science: Discrete Algorithms and their Complexity. CEPEK
CANCEL
ECB 9-335 Money and Banking
ADD
ECB 9-225 Money and Banking KNOOP
EDU 3-205 Foundations of Education O'CONNOR
EDU 6-380 Environmental Outdoor Education Internship (in Wisconsin) LUCK
HIS 4-115 Introductory Seminar: Knights and Chivalry (was HIS 4-113) HUBBY
HIS 9-115 Introductory Seminar: Knights and Chivalry HUBBY
CANCEL HIS 5-257 Islam and the West: The Roots of Misunderstanding
INT 9-201 Statistical Methods FREEMAN
CANCEL INT 56-501 Practice in Writing
CANCEL INT 78-501 Practice in Writing
CANCEL LAL 5-308 Language and Teaching Methodology
LAS 4-349 Topic: Race, Ethnicity, and Nation in Latin America McNEESE
LAT 4-101 Beginning Latin I WILL
LAT 6-102 Beginning Latin II GRUBER-MILLER
MAT 9-223 Calculus IV BEAN
PED 5-237 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries TRACY
ADD PHI 8-202 Ethics MULNIX
ADD PSY 9-255 Topic: Psychosocial Aspects of Alcohol C. RIVERS and L. RIVERS
REL 9-222 Religions of the World STEED
SPA 1-103 Beginning Spanish III GREEN-DOUGLASS
THE 8-115 Acting I VAN METER
CANCEL THE 3-261 Topic: Adobe Photoshop



Cornell Wilderness Term: Term 1, 2002/2003

The Cornell Wilderness Term (CWT) is an off-campus program comprising courses in the sciences, social sciences, arts and humanities. Courses are taught during the first term of the academic year at the ACM Wilderness Field Station, which is located on Low Lake in the Superior National Forest, just outside the Boundary Waters Canoe Area near Ely, Minnesota. CWT provides students with unique opportunities for field, laboratory and other creative work, reading, writing and reflecting in a wilderness setting. Co-curricular activities, such as camping, canoeing and evening seminars, enable cross-disciplinary sharing of ideas. CWT courses are advertised each year in the TERM TABLE. Participation in the program entails additional costs that are not covered by regular tuition or financial aid, and include transportation, room and board, and use of Wilderness Field Station facilities. For more information, go to http://www.cornellcollege.edu/politics/courses/allin/355/cwt-2002-index.htm.

Courses being offered in the 2002/2003 academic year are listed below:

  • BIO 1-321 Ecology (McCollum)
  • GEO 1-215 Structural Geology (Denniston)
  • PHI 1-224 Environmental Ethics (White)
  • POL 1-355 Seminar in American Politics (Allin)

Off-Campus Courses Taught by Cornell Faculty 2002-03:

These courses usually involve additional costs and require advance planning. Consult the course descriptions below and the course instructor for a description of the course, the prerequisites, deadlines, and cost. See under "Course Descriptions" (below) for more information and links.

  • ANT 5-206 West Indian People and Culture West Indies (Monagan)
  • ART 67-103/202 Drawing/Ceramics Mexico (Hanson)
  • BIO 1-321 Ecology Wilderness Field Station, Ely, MN (McCollum)
  • BIO 7-485 Biological Problems Costa Rica (Condon)
  • BIO/BMB 7-485 Problems Bahamas (Black/Tepper)
  • CLA 9-381 Greek Archaeology Greece (J. Gruber-Miller)
  • EDU 6-380 Environmental Outdoor Internship Wisconsin (Luck)
  • ENG 9-322 Mediaeval and Renaissance Drama Newberry Library, Chicago (Stavreva)
  • FRE 1-103 Beginning French III Louisiana (Boney)
  • FRE 9-206 Intermediate French Montréal (Crowder)
  • FRE 9-302 Advanced Conversation Montréal (Crowder)
  • GEO 1-215 Structural Geology Wilderness Field Station, Ely, MN (Denniston)
  • GEO 6-255 Modern/Ancient Carbonate Systems Bahamas (Greenstein)
  • GEO 4-315 Plate Tectonics Appalachians Denniston
  • HIS 8-357 Seminar in American History Newberry Library (Stewart)
  • PHI 1-224 Environmental Ethics Wilderness Field Station, Ely, MN (White)
  • POL 9-240/340 Security at Sea Florida Keys (Sutherland)
  • POL 1-355 Seminar in American Politics Wilderness Field Station, Ely, MN (Allin)
  • SPA 7-381 Peninsular Culture and Civilization Spain Ochoa

Changes in Majors and Minors:

Page 29 of the 2002-2004 Catalogue, item #3b, states that there are 11 interdepartmental majors. There are 10 such majors. They are:

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology,
Classical Studies,
Environmental Studies,
International Business,
International Relations,
Latin American Studies,
Russian Studies,
Sociology and Anthropology, and
Women's Studies.

Change in Environmental Studies Major:

 

Marine Sciences Concentration: Add GEO 105 (Marine Science) as a requirement.

Additions to electives in Ethnic Studies:

 

Add these three courses to the list of electives in item III on page 93 of the 2002-2004 Catalogue:

FRE 304 (Francophone Cultures of North America)
REL 335 (Religions of Ancient Mexico)
REL 362 (Holocaust and Hope)

Change in History Major:

 

New wording in bold: Major: A minimum of nine course credits in History, at least five of which must be at or above the 300 level, to include three courses at or above the 300 level in one of the following fields: Europe to 1700 (HIS 304 or 331-336), Europe since 1700 (courses numbered 315 to 329), American and Latin American History (courses numbered 349-357 and 394); and any two courses in History outside the primary field.

Change in Mathematics Teaching Major:

 

New wording in bold: Completion of the calculus sequence (MAT 141, 142, 143, and 223); MAT 221; at least four additional 300-level courses which include MAT 331 and either 327 or 337 and which exclude Individual Projects, Group Projects, and Internships; either INT 201 or, as part of the 300-level course requirement, the MAT 347-348 sequence; completion of CSC 140; and a grade point average in all Mathematics courses of at least 2.5. Students with other majors who intend to apply for certification in Mathematics as a second field must take MAT 331 and either 327 or 337, and have a grade point average in all Mathematics courses of at least 2.5. The department recommends that CSC 140, which provides knowledge of a programming language, be acquired by the end of the sophomore year. The number of courses required to complete the major depends on where a student places into the calculus sequence and which statistics option is chosen. For students starting in or receiving credit for Calculus I and choosing to take MAT 347-348, this will mean 10 credits, nine in mathematics. In addition to the foregoing requirements, prospective teachers must also apply for admission to the Teacher Education Program (preferably at the start of their sophomore year) and complete a second major in Secondary Education described under Education.


Course Information:

ANTHROPOLOGY
5-206. West Indian People and Culture. Ethnographic examination of the descendents of East Indian and Chinese indentured servants, and African slaves. Topics include maroonage, retentions, kinship and gender roles, the spirit world, fiesta, and cultural pluralism. Registration, when the course is taught off campus, entails additional costs. Alternate years. Prerequisites: Ant 101 and Permission of Instructor. (Social Science) Course Cap: 10. MONAGAN

9-257. Topic: Language, Culture, and Communications. Offers an introduction to linguistic anthropology. Encourages students to become critical thinkers about the ways that language and language usage affect and are affected by individuals, social groups, cultural practices, and politics. (Social Science) WOLSETH

1-260. Topic: Anthropology of the American South. This course looks at recent descriptions of life in Southern communities. From growing urban centers like Atlanta to pockets of poverty like the Mississippi Delta, the South is seen through a series of portraits of communities and people. Topics include industrial development, agriculture, immigration, religion, race relations, and the arts. (Social Science) ZIEGENHORN

BIOLOGY
5-108. Topic: Human Impacts on Biological Systems. We will examine the many ways in which humans influence organisms, populations, communities and ecosystems. We will read and discuss primary research reports, chapters from biological textbooks, and essays from popular magazines on a wide range of topics including: 1) the domestication of stock and crop species, 2) human impacts on the genetic structure of natural populations, 3) large scale, direct impacts of human activity on the natural populations of selected species, 4) the accidental or purposeful release of new species to natural communities, 5) large scale impacts of humans (e.g. habitat destruction and global warming), and 6) the conservation of endangered species, communities, ecosystems and biodiversity. (Science) BLACK

9-108. Topic: Insect Fact and Folklore. An introduction to the biology of insects -- the most diverse class of multicellular organisms on the planet. While learning about insect biology -- how they feed, breed, grow, invade our homes and crops, and benefit us economically -- we will also discuss many of the myths surrounding insects. Along the way, we will meet insects in literature and art. Each student will develop a set of pages to contribute to the existing Insect ABC web site. (Science) McCOLLUM

1-321. Ecology. Why are plants and animals found where they are and why are they more abundant in some places than others? How do interactions with other members of one's own species, other species, and the physical environment influence the distribution and abundance of organisms? These are the fundamental questions in the science of ecology. In this course we will explore the patterns of life on Earth, the hypotheses proposed to explain these patterns, the evidence and methods used to test these hypotheses, and the application of our ecological understanding to practical problems. This course will emphasize organisms in the vicinity of the Wilderness Field Station but will also draw upon ecological studies from around the globe to illustrate ecological concepts. Course work will include lectures, discussion and modeling in the classroom as well as field and laboratory research projects on the local biota. Prerequisites: BIO 141 and 142. McCOLLUM

CLASSICS
9-381. Greek Archaeology. Taught in Greece. The course will be an introduction to archaeology in Greece. We will begin the course on campus with a brief overview of Greece in the Bronze, Classical, Roman and Byzantine Periods. We will then spend almost three weeks visiting the archaeological sites throughout Greece, including Athens, Delphi, Olympia, Mycenae, Corinth, Bassae, and Crete. We will see temples, palaces, cities, sanctuaries, theaters, athletic facilities, and government buildings. In addition we will spend time in the major museums of Greece examining sculpture, vases, jewelry, and items of everyday use in the ancient world. For students interested in anthropology, architecture, art, art history, classics, history, religion, and theatre. Cost will be approximately $2500-$3000, depending upon air fare. It will include all travel expenses, hotel accommodations, entrance fees, guide services, tips, and most meals. For further information contact instructor. J. GRUBER-MILLER

COMPUTER SCIENCE
5-355. Advanced Topics in Computer Science: Discrete Algorithms and their Complexity. Algorithms that operate on graphs, parallel algorithms, probabilistic algorithms, and the strategy of divide and conquer. Methods for establishing lower bounds on complexity and for comparing the complexity of problems. Prerequisites: CSC 140 and 151. STAFF

ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS
7-268. Topic: The Global Environment. Economic analysis of global environmental issues, with special emphasis on developing countries. Review of basic economic theory with respect to environmental issues. Policy analysis of sustainable development, population growth, deforestation, air and water pollution, ecotourism, international hazardous waste, biodiversity and global warming. No prerequisite, although ECB 101 or ECB 102 is recommended. (Social Science) FAROOQI

ENGLISH 1-111-A. John Steinbeck’s America. This is the centennial year for this Nobel Prize winning writer. His best-known novel, The Grapes of Wrath, substantially shaped our cultural memory of the depression and the dust bowl. As a former Cornell student has said, “He was concerned about people left out of the mainstream of American culture, the dispersed, the marginalized. He makes us care about the people who are left behind” (Susan Shillinglaw, Director of the Center for Steinbeck Studies, Cornell College Class of 1973). This course will explore Steinbeck’s fiction and nonfiction. We will see films based on his fiction and read critical essays arguing for and against the artistic merits of his work. Course will help students become stronger writers and develop critical thinking skills. Requirements include three papers, revisions, and writing workshops. (Humanities, Writing Requirement) R MARTIN Open to First-Year Students Only

1-111-B. Jane Austen, Technology, and Literacy. Writers in Jane Austen's time encountered pressing problems due to advances in printing and a growing literacy rate. How could readers find good books without wasting time on bad ones? How could readers tell whether a source was credible? Could writers prevent the circulation of misinformation? What did it mean to be well-read? Today, readers and writers may face similar problems, having access to abundant information sources through the internet. While reading nineteenth-century novels about technology and literacy, students will learn how to find, evaluate, and use credible information to produce strong academic writing. Requirements include three papers, revisions, and writing workshops. (Humanities, Writing Requirement) MOUTON Open to First-Year Students Only

2-111. Living Authors: Writing and Revising Contemporary Literature. Contemporary Literature in America is thriving. But what are the working conditions of living writers? How do authors come up with their ideas? How do they develop them from idea to draft to book? In this course we will examine works by living authors, and the process by which writers develop their projects. In focusing on contemporary examples of fiction, poetry and children's literature we will try to ascertain a bit of "what's going on" in American letters right now. Visits from authors under consideration will augment our discussion, as will various public readings, both on the Cornell campus
and in Iowa City. Class discussion and group projects will hone your reading and responding skills, while drafting and revising formal papers will develop your analytic and argumentative writing ability. Same topic also offered in term 9. Not open to students who have previously completed ENG 111. (Humanities, Writing Requirement) COOPERMAN

4-111-A. John Steinbeck’s America. This is the centennial year for this Nobel Prize winning writer. His best-known novel, The Grapes of Wrath, substantially shaped our cultural memory of the depression and the dust bowl. As a former Cornell student has said, “He was concerned about people left out of the mainstream of American culture, the dispersed, the marginalized. He makes us care about the people who are left behind” (Susan Shillinglaw, Director of the Center for Steinbeck Studies, Cornell College Class of 1973). This course will explore Steinbeck’s fiction and nonfiction. We will see films based on his fiction and read critical essays arguing for and against the artistic merits of his work. Course will help students become stronger writers and develop critical thinking skills. Requirements include three papers, revisions, and writing workshops. Not open to students who have previously completed ENG 111. (Humanities, Writing Requirement) R MARTIN

4-111-B. Twentieth Century American Women Writers. This course focuses on fiction, poetry, memoirs and drama by such writers as Edith Wharton, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Katherine Anne Porter, Susan Glaspell, Zora Neale Hurston, Elizabeth Bishop, Paule Marshall, Alice Walker, Maya Angelou, and others. A published fiction writer and poet, as well as a produced television writer, the professor offers a group discussion format, with close reading of selected texts, examination of literary terms and thematic issues, consideration of cultural contexts, and screening of film adaptations. Same topic also offered in term 7. Not open to students who have previously completed ENG 111. (Humanities, Writing Requirement) RECKLING

5-111. Battlefields: Literature and Cultural Conflict. "Words are my tears," wrote Washington Post correspondent Peter Maass when covering the recent war in Bosnia. In this course, we will read documentary and fictional works, which portray war as fought not only on the front lines but within human psyches and upon the bodies of men and women. Bertolt Brecht's play responding to the Nazi invasion of Poland, Mother Courage and her Children, will provide the organizing frame of reference for the course. Other works may include Ivo Andric's epic novel The Bridge on the Drina, which earned its author the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1961, Slavenka Drakulic's terrifying and brilliant S.: A Novel about the Balkans (2000), and Michael Herr's classic account of the Vietnam War, Dispatches (1977), based on his front-line reports. Class discussion and group projects will develop your analytical and comparative reading skills; drafting and revising formal papers, responding critically to your writing and to that of others will equip you with the essential tools for college writing. Not open to students who have previously completed ENG 111. (Humanities, Writing Requirement) STAVREVA

6-111-A. Writing About Film and Literature. We will read T. S. Eliot's poem "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" and screen and re-screen Patricia Rozema's film "I've Heard the Mermaids Singing," read a short story or two by Edgar Allan Poe and screen and re-screen a Hitchcock film, and read a modernist novel and screen and re-screen a film adaptation of the novel. And, throughout, we will draft and redraft papers, from reviews to critical essays to research-informed critical projects. Challenging writing assignments will work to develop critical thinking and critical writing skills. Same topic also offered in term 7. Not open to students who have previously completed ENG 111. (Humanities, Writing Requirement) HANKINS

6-111-B. Big-Screen Shakespeare. In a sonnet, Shakespeare protests that his poetry has little new to offer his audiences: "So all my best is dressing old words new, / Spending again what is already spent." Filmmakers, from Hollywood's Golden Age to the present, beg to differ and find much in Shakespeare, which resonates in ever-new ways with the concerns, fears, passions, anxieties, and hopes of movie-going audiences. In this class, we will study in depth three of Shakespeare's plays and compare each with several cinematic adaptations. We will address the ways in which the films refocus the cultural concerns of the Renaissance texts. Plays may include Henry V, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Macbeth, Romeo and Juliet, or Hamlet. You will develop your critical vocabulary and skills for analyzing drama and film, will learn how to generate ideas for formal papers, to read critically your own writing and that of others, and to revise effectively. Not open to students who have previously completed ENG 111. (Humanities, Writing Requirement) STAVREVA

8-111. Jane Austen, Technology, and Literacy. Writers in Jane Austen's time encountered pressing problems due to advances in printing and a growing literacy rate. How could readers find good books without wasting time on bad ones? How could readers tell whether a source was credible? Could writers prevent the circulation of misinformation? What did it mean to be well-read? Today, readers and writers may face similar problems, having access to abundant information sources through the Internet While reading nineteenth-century novels about technology and literacy, students will learn how to find, evaluate, and use credible information to produce strong academic writing. Requirements include three papers, revisions, and writing workshops. Not open to students who have previously completed ENG 111. (Humanities, Writing Requirement) MOUTON

1-219. Special Topics: Writing Children's Books. This course in writing for children will focus on short manuscripts of 900-5000 words. Participants will read some outstanding recent books for children; read what respected authors in this field have written about writing for children; and work on manuscripts of their own. Additional topics will include manuscript submission procedures, and print and electronic resources for those interested in writing for children. Prerequisite: Writing-designated course. (Fine Arts) MARTIN, J.B.

6-316. Advanced Creative Writing Workshop. Advanced course in creative writing. Manuscript of 10 pages in length may be requested before permission is granted. Course may be repeated once for credit. Prerequisites: ENG 213 or 214 and permission of instructor. (Fine Arts) COOPERMAN

9-322. Medieval and Renaissance Drama: Shakespeare's Rivals. Taught at the Newberry Library in Chicago, this course will make use of the library's fabulous Renaissance collection to throw light on plays by Elizabethan and Jacobean dramatists who rivaled Shakespeare. Revenge, betrayal, sodomy, transvestism, public riot, idolatry -- these are some of the themes we will explore in plays by Christopher Marlowe, Thomas Kyd, Thomas Middleton, Thomas Dekker, and John Webster. You will learn the critical practices of New Historicism and cultural materialism, working with early printed texts and other cultural documents in one of the world's leading independent research libraries. Where appropriate, we will also take advantage of Chicago's rich theater scene. Course requirements include several position papers on the plays, a bibliography, a research paper abstract, and a research paper, which you will present to the class. Costs include a $525 program/housing fee, plus expenses for books, food, and personal items. Students enrolled in the class will be eligible for a $280 refund from Marriott if they have subscribed for the full-meal plan. A $475 deposit will be due in December. More information about studying at the Newberry is available at the web page of the ACM/GLCA Newberry Library Program for the Humanities or by contacting the instructor. See the course description at acm.edu/newberry/short-rivals.html. Course enrollment is limited to ten students. Prerequisite: Writing-designated course. (Humanities) STAVREVA

2-323. Shakespeare I: Comedies and Romances. "The play's the thing!" In this course, we will discuss selected comedies and romances by Shakespeare in their cultural context. Our reflections on the literary, performance, and cultural aspects of these plays will culminate in a student play production of Twelfth Night, enabled by the Stephen Lacey Memorial Shakespeare Fund and directed by renowned Royal Shakespeare Company actor Desmond Barrit. Performances are scheduled for November 15, 16 and 17: the full and continued commitment of the entire production staff is expected. For further information contact the instructor. Prerequisite: Writing-designated course. (Humanities) STAVREVA

3-336. Twentieth Century Fiction. The course will focus on novels by important Modernist writers: E. M. Forster, D. H. Lawrence, Dorothy Richardson and H. D. We will read E. M. Forster's Howards End and/or A Room with a View, Dorothy Richardson's "The Tunnel" from Pilgrimage; D. H. Lawrence's Lady Chatterley's Lover, and H. D.'s Bid Me to Live. Prerequisite: Writing-designated course. (Humanities) HANKINS

4-351. African-American Literature. The topic will be African American Women Writers and Directors. Prerequisite: Writing-designated course. (Humanities) HANKINS

714. Literature in Action: The Shakespeare Play. (1/4) Participation in any of the many activities involved in the production of the English Department Shakespeare Play (or a similar play): acting in a major role, scenery and props design and construction, costume/make-up design and construction, lighting and sound design and operation, stage management, theatre administration and publicity. Participation must be supervised by a member of the department, and the work carried out within a single semester. Can be repeated for credit. (Fine Arts) STRAVREVA

715. Literature in Action: Editing. (1/4) Serving in one of the supervisory positions for the English Department literary magazine Open Field (or similar magazine): Editor, Assistant Editor, Web Editor, Art/Design Editor. Participation must be supervised by a member of the department, and the work carried out within a single semester. May be repeated for credit. (Fine Arts)

FRENCH
1-103. Beginning French III. We are tentatively planning to spend the third weekend of the course (Thursday afternoon through Sunday evening) in Louisiana to experience great music, delicious food, and rich Francophone culture at the Festivals Acadiens in Lafayette. Costs are currently estimated at $150 per student. For more information, consult the website http://www.cornellcollege.edu/french/lafayette.shtm or contact Prof. Jan Boney. BONEY

2-303. Cultures of France and Francophone Africa. Substantially revised course. 20th century French and Francophone culture from the perspectives of media, politics, intellectual life, and popular culture, particularly food. Preparation (and consuming!) of an elegant French dinner is part of the course. Students follow the francophone world throughout the term by reading newspapers, news magazines and listening to radio and television news, all via the Web. A consideration of language planning policy in francophone Africa provides a further opportunity to explore the connection between culture and language. May be repeated for credit when material is substantially different, as it is in the fall of 2002. Prerequisite: FRE 205 or 206. (Humanities) BONEY

The old French 303: French and Francophone Cultures has been split into two culture courses: French 2-303: Cultures of France and Francophone Africa (taught in 2002-03 by Prof. Jan Boney) and FRE 304: Francophone Cultures of North America. The new FRE 303 focuses on Francophone cultures of Europe and Africa. The material will be significantly different from 303 taught in 2001, so if you've already had French 303 you may repeat French 303 for credit in 2002. (French 304, Francophone Cultures of North America, will be taught block 1, Fall 2003.)

9-206/302. Intermediate French/Advanced Conversation in Quebec. Why not take French in Montréal? Students will stay with a French-speaking family in Montréal, second-largest French-speaking city in the world. One weekend will be in historic Québec City. The trip includes daily classes and assignments, tours, trips, museums, cultural events, and plays, as well as informal activities designed to acquaint students with the unique culture of Québec. FRE 206 is the off-campus version of FRE 205, and completes the B.A. language requirement. Prerequisite: FRE 103 or permission of instructor. FRE 302, Advanced Conversation in Québec, is open to anyone who has completed FRE 205 or equivalent, and counts towards the French minor and major. Costs have not yet been determined, but are estimated at $1500 or less, including transportation, housing, cultural activities, and tours. For further information, consult the website http://www.cornellcollege.edu/french/montreal.shtml or contact Prof. Diane Crowder. CROWDER

GERMAN
1-383. Weimar. A survey of the Weimar Republic, 1919-1933, when Germany struggled to overcome its defeat in World War I. Readings and discussion of its economic and political history, and the developments in society, literature and cinema. Analysis of Nazism's rise to power. Prerequisite: GER 302 or 304. Offered every third year. (Humanities) CONNELL

HISTORY
1-112. Introductory Seminar: Declarations of Independence. This course is the history of three famous documents: Thomas Jefferson's "Declaration of Independence" (1776), Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott's "Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions" (1848), and Abraham Lincoln's "Emancipation Proclamation" (1863). All three documents are important for understanding the search for freedom by Americans, women, and African-Americans. (Humanities, Writing requirement) LUCAS

4-115. Introductory Seminar: Knights and Chivalry. This course provides an introduction to the social life of knights in the Middle Ages. Drawing on epic, romance and chronicles, the course will explore the relationship between the ideals of chivalry and the everyday lives of knights in court and castle. Attention will also be given to ideas of courtly love and aristocratic women. Same topic also offered in term 9. (Humanities) HUBBY

2-171. Early East Asian Civilization: China. Explores the historical foundation of Chinese civilization's influence on East Asia from the earliest times to the 17th century. Promotes the development of the students’ knowledge and awareness of the East Asian world and their basic skills in particular writing and creative and analytical thinking in this area of study. (Humanities) HUANG

5-257. Islam and the West: The Roots of Misunderstanding. This course will provide students with an historical and cultural understanding of the conflict between western countries and Islamic societies (including American Muslim communities). Students will also be encouraged to study and discuss such crucial issues as the role of women in Islamic societies and the impact of globalization on countries with ancient traditions and customs. (Humanities) KIA

4-356. African-Americans in U.S. History: Slavery. Slavery from colonial times to the Civil War. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. (Humanities) LUCAS

2-357. Seminar in American History: The Constitution and Racism--The Japanese-American Experience. The suspension of the Constitution on the basis of race and military necessity remains one of the most dramatic and serious chapters in American racism. The seminar examines the roots of anti-Asian sentiment, the Chinese and Japanese immigration, and the denial of basic civil liberties to Japanese-Americans in 1942. The course considers the role of racism, the President, Congress and Supreme Court as well as the personal dimensions of life in the internment camps. The larger issue of Japanese-American loyalty and military necessity is assessed. Attention is given to the successful efforts to secure "redress" from the U.S. government. Readings from the perspective of sociology, political science, religion, and literature are included together with film and personal witnesses. (Humanities) THOMAS

3-357. Seminar: The Documentary Imagination in American History. This course will explore the relationship between historical truth and fiction through an examination of the documentary impulse in 1930s America. During the 1930s, American writers, photographers, filmmakers, and social scientists began experimenting with the documentary form as a means for capturing the reality of people previously left out of the historical record. Through our examination of different types of documentary expression, including photography, ethnography, literature, film, and oral history, students will learn to interpret these texts as historical sources. Students will also experience first-hand the various stages of documentary production. In the past, students had the opportunity to conduct their own oral history interviews, which they videotaped, and then edited into a final documentary narrative. (Humanities) STEWART

8-357. Seminar: Chicago: The Transformation of America's Second City, 1880-1940. This course offers students the opportunity to explore the history of Chicago and complete an original research project based upon a first-hand exploration of the city and the holdings of the Newberry Library. The seminar will examine the crucial years in Chicago's evolution from regional center to metropolis by looking at the related themes of urbanization, industrialization, and immigration. (Humanities) STEWART

9-377. Topic in Asian History: The History of Communist China. The course will look at the origins of communism in China and particularly focus on the political and economic developments of China since World War II. HUANG

INTERDEPARTMENTAL
202. Statistical Methods II. A continuation of INT 201, Statistical Methods I. This course will explore in more depth several methods of analyzing data. Topics covered will be chosen from linear regression (simple linear, and multivariate), ANOVA, nonparametrics, and categorical data analysis. Prerequisite: INT 201. First offered Term 3, 2003/04.

LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY
4-349. Topic: Race, Ethnicity, and Nation in Latin America. This course explores conceptions of race, ethnicity, and nationhood in nineteenth and twentieth century Latin America. Specifically we will consider the changing meanings of race and ethnicity and their relationships to the consolidation of national identities. Topics include racial ideologies, competing models of “the nation,” and the gendering of racial, ethnic, and national identities. Prerequisite: HIS 141 or LAS 141. (Humanities) McNEESE

MATHEMATICS
110. On The Shoulders of Giants: Great Mathematical Ideas. Investigation of a variety of great mathematical discoveries past and present. The ideas investigated will not require significant previous mathematical background, but will require the student to actively participate in the process of mathematical discovery. Only by doing mathematics can the creativity, beauty, and mathematical importance of these great ideas be understood. Specific content varies with the course instructor, but may include subjects such as geometry, game theory, probability, number theory, the nature of infinity, chaos and fractals. Prerequisite: two years of high school algebra. Recommended for non-mathematics majors. This course is not open to students who have taken MAT 141 or higher. This course does not count toward a mathematics major or minor. (Mathematics) First offered Term 9, 2003/04.

PHYSICS
7-125. Science through Film and Fiction. Scientific topics and issues found in selected novels and feature films. Students will investigate specific scientific concepts and use them as case studies illustrating the historical development of science, the process of scientific, and the role of science and technology in society. Intended for non-science majors. Alternate years. (Science) SHERMAN

PHYSICAL EDUCATION
1 -257. Modern Olympic Games. This is a course that will use the modern Olympics to explore sports in the greater society. Gender, race, nationalism, commercialism, professionalism and substance abuse are just a few of the issues that will be examined. The 1936 Berlin, 1968 Mexico City, 1972 Munich and 1984 Los Angeles games will be looked at in depth. The role of sport in the greater society will be a theme that will be followed throughout the course. We will try to discern how we got to where we are today from the humble beginnings by Pierre de Cubertein in the 1890's. Finally we will take a look into the 21st Century and try to see what the future might hold. Outside readings from primary as well as secondary sources will be used in this course to develop class discussions on the variety of topics covered. Students will research three short papers (4-5 pages) on topics that are of particular interest to them. We will do group projects where groups of students present the highlights and significance of an individual summer or winter game. TIMM

POLITICS
1-355. American Politics Seminar: Wilderness Politics. The policy and politics of wilderness preservation and management by the federal government with special attention to the case of the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness (BWCAW) in northern Minnesota. Taught on location at the ACM Wilderness Field Station and in the BWCAW. Prerequisite: POL 262 (Social Science) ALLIN

PSYCHOLOGY
9-255. Topic: Psychosocial Aspects of Alcohol. An introduction to the historical, social, psychological and physiological aspects of alcohol use and abuse. Alcoholism is discussed from a constitutional, psychological and sociological perspective. Treatment, prevention and intervention strategies for this disorder are discussed. This course is highly relevant for students in major areas such as psychology, sociology, anthropology, criminal justice, pre-medicine, athlete training and education. The course is open to all students. Prerequisite: PSY 161, or SOC 101, or ANT 101. (Social Science)
C. RIVERS and L. RIVERS

8-359. Advanced Topic: Readings in Emotion: Understanding Passion. Why are some people more "emotional" than others? Why does an insult enrage one person, move another to tears, and have no impact on a third? How can a piece of music or art fill us with joy-or sadness? This course is designed to address questions like these. We will be examining a variety of aspects of emotional experience, including theoretical/historical perspectives of emotion; the biology of emotions; the ways one can measure emotion; the interface of emotion with motivation, cognition and social behavior; the concepts of emotional intelligence and emotional regulation; and the role of emotion in psychological disorders. Additional topics and/or individual projects may include emotion and language, emotional development, and emotion in animals. Prerequisite: any 200 level Psychology course. (Social Science) GANZEL

THEATRE
7-276. Topic: Play Analysis. What is a play? How do plays work? How do they mean? This course offers answers to these questions (and others) by studying and practicing play analysis with an emphasis on exploring the potential for live performance embedded in a written text. Students will learn to employ a three-tiered approach to analyzing plays: textual/structural, dramaturgical/contextual, and creative/intuitive. While students will acquire considerable knowledge about the specific plays studied, the goal of the course involves learning skills that can be used to explore any playtext. (Humanities) HUNTER

9-377. Advanced Topic: Twentieth Century Performance. In the twentieth century, the notion of performance expanded to include works that deal with ideas and formal elements that are not bound up in narrative. Oftentimes, these works derived form the fine arts as opposed to the performing arts. At the same time, theatrical works were fashioned that were not text based, or which derived from the personal experiences of the actor/performer. These works have been variously labeled as happenings, dance events, performance art, and, most recently, simply as performance. This course examines representative selections of such work, explores the historical circumstances of their creation, and argues for an expanded understanding of theatre that encompasses all kinds of aesthetic performance. HUNTER

WOMEN'S STUDIES
4-258. Topic: Feminism and Fairy Tales; or Don't Bet on the Prince. The course fosters an understanding of the way fairy tales have functioned in Europe and North America since the beginning of the nineteenth century, and introduces various critical theories and approaches to this genre. Emphasis will be placed on the depiction of gender stereotypes and the significance of feminism in the fairy-tale tradition. Variants of the tales from European and nonwestern cultures will be introduced to explore how the literary genre has undergone vast changes due to socio-cultural shifts in the last two hundred years leading to cinematic transformations. ROMALOV

2-276. Topic: Gender, Sexuality, and the Movies. An introduction to feminist perspectives on gender and sexuality in the movies. This discussion course includes viewings and readings about classics (Mae West movies); recent blockbusters (Boys Don't Cry); and foreign films (East is East). Students will complete a critical viewing journal and write two papers, and may do a comparable creative project in lieu of the second paper. MOUTON