Rebecca Entel, Glenn Freeman, Leslie K. Hankins, Michelle Mouton, Shannon Reed (chair), Kirilka Stavreva

Fosters a general understanding of English and American literary history while enabling students to concentrate in one of three areas in the field of English: literature; creative writing; or film studies.

Major: Must complete a minimum of 11 courses at the 200, 300, or 400-level (must complete 10 courses if the course for #2 below simultaneously fulfills another requirement), to include the following:

  1. Two of the following foundation courses in the field of English, one of which must be in the area of concentration (recommended to be completed by the end of sophomore year): ENG 201, 202, or 215.
  2. One of the following courses with emphasis on social and/or global issues (may simultaneously fulfill one additional requirement for the English major if eligible): ENG 240, 311, 327, 347 (when offered at the Wilderness Station), 350, 351, 367, 370, any 200- or 300-level literature course offered by the Classical and Modern Languages Department, other than FRE 311 (Introduction to Literary Analysis in French), GER 311 (Introduction to Literature), SPA 311 (Introduction to Textual Analysis).
  3. One of the following concentrations:
    1. Literature 
      1. At least one course from Medieval and Renaissance Literature: ENG 321-327; 
      2. Three courses, to be distributed among at least two of the following literary-historical groups:
        Restoration and 18th Century: ENG 328, 329, 331;
        19th-Century Literature: ENG 333, 334, 343, 345; 351 (depending on topic)
        20th-21st Century: ENG 335, 336, 347, 350, 351 (depending on topic), 361, 363, 364, 365 (depending on topic), 367;
      3. One course from ENG 311, 319, 371;
      4. One elective in the department.
    2. Creative Writing
      1. Three courses, to be distributed among three of the following literary-historical groups:
        Medieval and Renaissance Literature: ENG 321-327;
        Restoration and 18th Century: ENG 328, 329, 331;
        19th-Century Literature: ENG 333, 334, 343, 345; 351 (depending on topic)
        20th-21st Century: ENG 335, 336, 347, 350, 351 (depending on topic), 361, 363, 364, 365 (depending on topic), 367;
      2. Either ENG 317 or 318;
      3. One additional course from ENG 220, 317, 318, 381-383, THE 321;
      4. One elective in the department.
    3. Film Studies
      1. Three courses, to be distributed among three of the following literary-historical groups:
        Medieval and Renaissance Literature: ENG 321-327;
        Restoration and 18th Century: ENG 328, 329, 331;
        19th Century: ENG 333, 334, 343, 345; 351 (depending on topic)
        20th-21st Century: ENG 335, 336, 347, 350, 351 (depending on topic), 361, 363, 364, 365 (depending on topic), 367;
      2. Two additional courses from ENG 327, 365, 370, 371 (depending on topic), 372, HIS 364, CLA 364;
      3. One elective in the department.
  4. Capstone Experience: ENG 411; and ENG 412 for the creative writing concentration or 413 for the literature or film studies concentration

The department recommends that foundation courses be completed by the end of the sophomore year and that majors consider an internship in an area of interest in the junior or senior year. Transfer students must take a minimum of six courses toward the major at Cornell College.

Teaching Major: The same as above, to include 311; one course selected from 323, 324, or 327; and one course selected from 343, 345, or 347; In addition, English majors seeking a teaching certification must complete COM 121 (Speech Communication) and EDU 322 (Secondary Arts, Languages, and Adolescent Literature); EDU 322 may satisfy the requirement for an elective in the concentration. One semester of student teaching may satisfy the second course in the senior capstone.  Prospective teachers must also apply for admission to the Teacher Education Program (preferably at the start of their sophomore year) and complete coursework leading to secondary certification described under Education. Prospective teachers should request a current list of the specific course requirements from the Education Office.

Minor: A minimum of six course credits in English at the 200 or 300-level to include the following: ENG 201; ENG 202 or ENG 215; three courses selected from at least two of the following groups: (1) ENG 321-331; (2) 333-351, 361-372; (3) 317-318, 381-383; and one elective.

111. Topics in Literature, Film, or Cultural Studies
Writing seminar for first-year students, an intensive engagement with a topic in literature, film, or cultural studies. See Topics Courses for current topics and descriptions. (Writing Requirement)

201. Introduction to Literary Studies
Introduces students to methods of reading, analyzing, and interpreting literature. Focus on understanding conventions and technical aspects of a literary work and on introduction to multiple genres of literature. Students do close reading and are introduced to additional methods of critical inquiry involving literature. Shows students how to apply critical and literary vocabulary, and to develop writing and research skills. See Topics Courses for current course description. (Humanities) HANKINS, MOUTON, REED or STAVREVA

202. Introduction to Film Studies
An introduction to film as an art form, cultural practice, and institution. The class focuses on questions of film form and style (narrative, editing, sound, framing, mise-en-scène) and introduces students to concepts in film history and theory (e.g. national cinemas, periods and movements, institution, authorship, spectatorship, ideology, style, genre). Students develop a basic critical vocabulary and research practices for examining film. They apply their skills in oral and written analysis and interpretation to a wide range of films: old and new, local and global, mainstream and less familiar. (Humanities) HANKINS, MOUTON, REED or STAVREVA

215. Introduction to Creative Writing
Beginning course in creative writing and an introductory course to the English major. Students will explore a myriad of writing techniques and approaches to writing in a variety of genres. Students will write, share work, and offer critiques. The course also includes the study of published authors as models for student writing, as literary historical context for artistic creation, and for the study of creative theory. Students will learn to analyze texts from a writer’s perspective, which they will apply to their own writing and to the study of literature in the major. (Fine Arts) ENTEL or G. FREEMAN

220. Nature Writing
A creative writing workshop focused on writing concerned with the environment and human relationships with the environment. Our focus will be on non-fiction and the lyric essay. Students will produce a range of creative works and will engage in thoughtful discussion and critique of peers’ work. We will also read widely in the tradition of environmental writers, including writers such as Rachel Carson, Aldo Leopold, Sigurd Olson, Annie Dillard, Barry Lopez, Terry Tempest Williams, and Gary Snyder to study techniques used by these writers. Offered in alternate or every third year. (Fine Arts) G. FREEMAN

240. Theatre, Architecture, and the Arts in Great Britain
A study of British literary, architectural, and theatre tourism. While reflecting on the historical and present-day cultural tourism in Great Britain, students visit architectural, literary, and historical sites throughout Scotland and England, attend multiple theatrical events in Stratford and London, and visit art galleries and museums in London. Students will read travel writing, keep an academic travel journal, and write several short papers. Team-taught in Great Britain. Registration entails additional costs. Prerequisite: writing-designated course (W), or ENG 201, 202, or 215. Alternate years. (Humanities) MOUTON and STAFF

273-277. Topics in English Studies
A focus on a topic in literary studies, in film, or on a topic that bridges literature, film, creative writing or other arts. See Topics Courses for current course descriptions.

290/390. Individual Project: see Courses 290/390.

311. Grammar and the Politics of English
An examination of the structures and forms which currently govern standard usage of the English language. Encompasses a broad view of grammar as a subject by a wide-ranging investigation of the history and development of the language. Examines the social and political implications of the development of English as a global language. Prerequisites: sophomore standing and a writing-designated course (W), or ENG 201, 202, or 215. Alternate years. (Humanities) REED

317. Advanced Poetry Writing
Advanced course in writing poetry. Students will study techniques, share work, and offer critiques. The course will also include the study of published poetry. Additional topics will include publication options, manuscript submission procedures, and resources for writers. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisites: ENG 215 and sophomore standing. Alternate years. (Fine Arts) G. FREEMAN

318. Advanced Fiction Writing
Advanced course in writing fiction. Students will study techniques, share work, and offer critiques. The course will also include the study of published fiction. Additional topics may include publication options, manuscript submission procedures, and resources for writers. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: ENG 215 and sophomore standing. Alternate years. (Fine Arts)

319. Advanced Critical Writing
Advanced course in academic writing. In discussion, intensive workshops, and individual instruction, students will critically read and evaluate their own work and the work of their peers, as well as professional academic writers. In addition to writing several papers, students will substantially revise and expand the research for a paper they have written for a previous course. Students must bring to class on the first day a short paper they are prepared to further research and revise. The course will also give considerable attention to advanced information literacy and advanced writing style. This course is especially appropriate for students who intend to pursue graduate study or careers with a strong writing component. Prerequisites: writing-designated course (W), or ENG 201, 202, or 215, and junior standing. Alternate years or every third year.

321. Studies in Medieval Literature
Topical concentrations in English and world literature of the Middle Ages, including cultural context. Topics may include: Arthurian romance, Dante, Chaucer, the mystical tradition, or chivalry. See Topics Courses for current course description. Prerequisites: writing-designated course (W), or ENG 201, 202, or 215, and sophomore standing. Offered every third year. No S/U option. (Humanities) STAVREVA

322. Medieval and Renaissance Drama: Shakespeare's Rivals
A research seminar studying the drama of Shakespeare’s predecessors, contemporaries, and rivals – such as Cary, Dekker, Ford, Marlowe, Middleton, etc. – within the context of the booming printing and theater trades of early modern England. Prerequisites: sophomore standing and one of the following: writing designated course (W), ENG 201, 202, or 215. Offered every third year. (Humanities) STAVREVA

323. Shakespeare I: Comedies and Romances
Analytical, cultural-historical, and performative approaches to Shakespeare. Discussion of selected comedies and romances in their cultural contexts. Prerequisite: writing-designated course (W), or ENG 201, 202, or 215. Alternate years. (Humanities) STAVREVA

324. Shakespeare II: Histories and Tragedies
Critical analysis of Shakespeare's histories and tragedies, with attention paid to their cultural contexts and performative aspects. Prerequisite: writing-designated course (W), or ENG 201, 202, or 215. (Humanities) STAVREVA

325. Studies in Renaissance Non-Dramatic Literature
English and world literature from the period 1500-1660. Topics may include: women writers; literature of geographic exploration; lyric poetry; studies of authors, such as Donne, Elizabeth I, Spenser, or of authors’ circles, such as the Sidney family. Prerequisite: ENG 111, 201, or 215. Offered in alternate years or every third year. (Humanities) STAVREVA

326. Milton
This course will provide a deep and thorough engagement with John Milton's epic poem, Paradise Lost. Attention will be given to the reading practices of early modern and post-modern audiences. Additional materials may include critical articles and other works by John Milton, like Comus, Samson Agonistes, or selections from his sonnets or prose works. The course will conclude with a consideration of contemporary uses for Milton's epic. Prerequisites: writing-designated course (W), and ENG 201, 202, or 215. Alternate years or every third year. (Humanities) REED

327. Shakespeare after Shakespeare: Performance and Cultural Criticism
A study of Shakespeare’s plays as blueprints for performance, and of the historically and culturally diverse forms of Shakespearean performances on stage and screen, including Asian, East European, and other renditions. Focus on the relationship of performance to the processes of cultural formation and reflection. Students in the class engage in performance workshops and production activities enabled by the Stephen Lacey Memorial Shakespeare Fund. Prerequisite: writing-designated course (W), or ENG 201, 202, or 215. Alternate years or every third year. (Humanities) STAVREVA

328. Eighteenth Century English Literature
Drama, poetry and essays of the period 1660-1798. Discussion of the interplay between culture and literature. Topics may include colonialism; civility, honor and barbarism; politics and poetics of Restoration drama. Authors may include Behn, Wycherly and Rochester, Addison and Steele, Swift, Pope, and Eliza Haywood. Prerequisite: writing-designated course (W), or ENG 201, 202, or 215. Alternate years or every third year. (Humanities) REED

329. Eighteenth Century Fiction
Examination of fiction written between 1660-1789. Discussion of the novel and the anti-novel using works such as Pamela, Joseph Andrews, The Female Quixote, Tristram Shandy, and Northanger Abbey. Some discussion of contemporary creative and critical responses to eighteenth-century fiction. Prerequisite: writing-designated course (W), or ENG 201, 202, or 215. Alternate years or every third year. (Humanities) REED

331. British Literature of the Romantic Period
An examination of intellectual, political, and aesthetic movements of the English Romantic period 1789-1832. May focus on a topic such as gender and Romantic poetics, the Gothic impulse, or slavery and abolition. Prerequisite: writing-designated course (W), or ENG 201, 202, or 215. Alternate years. (Humanities) MOUTON

333. Victorian Literature
Poetry, novels, essays, and plays written between 1837 and 1901. May focus on a topic, such as the Victorian life cycle, political reform movements, or turn-of-the-century decadence. Prerequisite: writing-designated course (W), or ENG 201, 202, or 215. Alternate years. (Humanities) MOUTON

334. Nineteenth Century English Novel
A study of one or more forms: the domestic novel, the Gothic novel, the serial novel, the novel of social critique. Authors may include Austen, Shelley, Dickens, Eliot, Trollope, and Wilde. Prerequisite: writing-designated course (W), or ENG 201, 202, or 215. Alternate years. (Humanities)

335. Virginia Woolf
Novels and essays by the iconic and innovative early twentieth century British writer and critic, Virginia Woolf, including A Room of One's Own and other groundbreaking essays, novels such as Jacob's Room, To the Lighthouse, Mrs. Dalloway, The Waves, Orlando, and Between the Acts, and her autobiographical writing "A Sketch of the Past." Prerequisite: writing-designated course (W), or ENG 201, 202, or 215. Alternate years. (Humanities) HANKINS

336. Early Twentieth Century Literature
Texts from the first half of the twentieth century, chosen from British and American writers such as Rebecca West, Ernest Hemingway, Dorothy Richardson, H. D., Virginia Woolf, James Joyce, D. H. Lawrence, Zora Neale Hurston, and others. The course may include films of the early twentieth century, and may focus on a topic such as films and literature of World War I or transatlantic modernist experiments in literature and film. See Topics Courses for expanded current course description. Prerequisite: writing-designated course (W), or ENG 201, 202, or 215. Alternate years. (Humanities) HANKINS

343. The American Renaissance
Literary and cultural trends in the early- and mid-nineteenth century with attention to Transcendentalism, Melville's Moby-Dick, and philosophical contradictions within the period. Authors in addition to Melville may include Emerson, Thoreau, Fuller, Douglass, and Alcott. Prerequisite: writing-designated course (W), or ENG 201, 202, or 215. Offered every third year. (Humanities) ENTEL

345. Late Nineteenth Century American Literature
Literary and cultural trends of the late-nineteenth century with a focus on the relationship between literary and social movements of the time period. Authors may include Twain, James, Whitman, Davis, Gilman, and Riis. Course may include a civic engagement component and/or group research project investigating the role of literature in reform movements. Prerequisite: writing-designated course (W), or ENG 201, 202, or 215. Alternate years. (Humanities) STAFF

347. Literature and Arts of the Wilderness
Writing and other arts of the wilderness, including Canadian and American writers, painters, and photographers. The 2012-13 course will be taught at the Wilderness Field Station in Minnesota. Registration entails additional costs. See Topics Courses for expanded current course description. Prerequisite: writing-designated course (W), or ENG 201, 202, or 215. Alternate years. (Humanities)

350. American Nature Writers
Study of writers who share a concern with human relationships with nature, landscape, and the environment. Authors may include Muir, Leopold, Dillard, Carson, Abbey, and Krakauer. Prerequisite: writing-designated course (W), or ENG 201, 202, or 215. Alternate years. (Humanities)

351. Studies in African-American Literature
Study of African-American Literature and/or film. Topics may include African-American women writers and directors. See topics courses for expanded current course description. Prerequisite: writing-designated course (W), or ENG 201, 202, or 215. Offered every third year. (Humanities)

361. Modern Poetry
Poetic trends in the first half of the twentieth century. Poets may include Eliot, Stevens, Williams, Stein, Loy, Millay, Hughes, and H.D. Prerequisite: writing-designated course (W), or ENG 201, 202, or 215. Offered every third year. (Humanities)

363. Contemporary Fiction
Intensive look at recent and experimental developments in fiction as represented by writers such as Sherman Alexie, Leslie Marmon Silko, Maxine Hong Kingston, Don DeLillo, and Tim O'Brien. Prerequisite: writing-designated course (W), or ENG 201, 202, or 215. Offered every third year. (Humanities)

364. Contemporary Poetry
Poets whose work has come to prominence since 1950 and an overview of poetic trends in America. Poets may include Lowell, Ginsberg, Ashbery, Rich, Plath, Olds, and Graham. Prerequisite: writing-designated course (W), or ENG 201, 202, or 215. Offered every third year. (Humanities) G. FREEMAN

365. Comparative Literature and Cinema
Investigating some of the multi-faceted connections between literature and film, this course may focus on a topic such as the investigation of transatlantic avant-garde film and the "little magazines" or film societies and literary coteries of the early twentieth century. See Topics Courses for expanded current course description. Prerequisite: writing-designated course (W), or ENG 201, 202, or 215. Alternate years. (Humanities) HANKINS

367. Multicultural Literature
Critical analysis of texts by national and international writers of "minority" status, which may include groups marginalized by race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic class. Consideration of the role of an author's status or identity in literary study. Prerequisite: writing-designated course (W), or ENG 201, 202, or 215. Alternate years. (Humanities)

370. AIDS Literature, Film, and Social Theory
Study of the historical emergence and consequences of HIV/AIDS through memoirs, novels, plays, documentary and feature films, and essays. In evaluating the way literature shapes our understanding of HIV and AIDS, we will explore pertinent issues of race, gender, nationality, and sexual identity. May include service learning component with required field trips. Prerequisite: writing-designated course (W), or ENG 201, 202, or 215. Offered in alternate years or every third year. (Interdisciplinary) MOUTON

371. Literary Theory
Survey of literary theories with emphasis on the second half of the twentieth century through the present. Theories considered may include Narrative Theory, Feminist theories, Reader-Response Theory, New Historicism, Postmodernism, and Cultural Studies as well as newer approaches. Prerequisite: writing-designated course (W), or ENG 201, 202, or 215. Alternate years. Recommended for students who may be interested in pursuing graduate studies in English. (Humanities)

372. Film and Film Studies
The study of films as artistic and cultural texts. The focus may be on the study of an individual director, Hitchcock, or a broader topic, such as Women Directors, or a particular period in film history, such as Avant Garde Films of the 1920's and 1930's. See Topics Courses for expanded current course description. (This is not a film production course.) Prerequisite: writing-designated course (W), or ENG 201, 202, or 215. (Humanities) HANKINS

373-374. Advanced Topics in Literature
Intensive focus on an advanced topic in literary studies, or on a topic that bridges literary studies and other media of artistic expression. See Topics Courses for current course descriptions. Prerequisite: writing-designated course (W), or ENG 201, 202, or 215; individual courses may have additional prerequisites. (Humanities)

377-378. Advanced Topics in Film, Intermedia, or Cultural Studies
Intensive focus on an advanced topic in film or other new media. See Topics Courses for current course descriptions. Prerequisite: writing-designated course (W), or ENG 201, 202, or 215; individual courses may have additional prerequisites.

380. Internship
Diverse internship options may include writing and editing in the commercial world, such as working for a newspaper, a magazine, a publishing house, or another communications medium. Prerequisite: writing-designated course (W), or ENG 201, 202, or 215. See Courses 280/380. (CR)

381-383. Advanced Topics in Creative or Media Writing
Advanced study of creative writing or writing for one of the communications media. See Topics Courses for current course descriptions. Prerequisite: writing-designated course (W), or ENG 201, 202, or 215; individual courses may have additional prerequisites. STAFF

399. Summer Internship
Diverse internship options may include writing and editing in the commercial world, such as working for a newspaper, a magazine, a publishing house, or another communications medium. Prerequisite: writing-designated course (W). See Courses 299/399. (CR)

411. Senior Seminar
Advanced, theoretically informed engagement with literary studies, broadly defined, including reflection on what the English major brings to intellectual and creative life beyond the undergraduate years. See Topics Courses for current topics and course descriptions. Prerequisites: English major and senior standing. No S/U option. (Humanities) HANKINS or REED

412. Senior Project Workshop in Creative Writing
This course serves as the second half of the capstone experience for students completing the English major’s creative writing concentration. Students will work independently on a creative writing project started in previous workshops, meet independently with the instructor to discuss their progress and work on successive drafts, and meet with other students for an intensive workshop of projects. Students will also work with the instructor to create, complete, and discuss a reading list relevant to their project. The goal is to produce work for publication and/or public performance. The Senior Project Workshop will be conducted as a combination of workshop with other course members, independent study, and one-on-one mentoring. The block will also include professional training in the submission and publication process as well as graduate school and careers in writing. Prerequisite: ENG 411. No S/U option. G. FREEMAN

413. Senior Project Workshop in Critical Writing
This course serves as the second half of the capstone experience for students completing the English major’s concentrations in Literary Studies and in Film and Literary Studies. Students will work independently to develop a project proposed in ENG 411 into a theoretically informed research thesis of substantial length. The goal is to produce work for public presentation or for publication in an undergraduate journal or comparable venue. The course will also include professional training in the processes of conference and publication submission and review. The Senior Project Workshop will be conducted as a combination of workshop with other course members, independent study, and one-on-one mentoring. Prerequisite: ENG 411. No S/U option. STAVREVA

510. Book Arts (1/4)
The course will introduce participants to the field of book studies, including letterpress and book arts, typesetting, printing, and book construction through demonstrations and hands-on experience. Sessions may also include field trips to libraries and museums, fine presses, and/or Book Studies Programs. To earn credit, students must complete four sessions and complete a culminating project. A complete schedule of workshops and fieldtrips will be distributed at an informational session to be held at the beginning of the academic year. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. HANKINS, MOUTON and STAVREVA (CR)

714. Literature in Action: The Shakespeare Play (1/4)
Participation in any of the many activities involved in the production of the English Department Shakespeare Play or a similar performance: acting in a major role, scenery and props design and construction, costume/make-up design and construction, lighting and sound design and operation, stage management, theatre administration and publicity. Participation must be supervised by a member of the Department and the work carried out within a single semester. May be repeated for credit. Alternate years or every third year. (Fine Arts) STAVREVA (CR)

715. Literature in Action: Editing (1/4)
Serving in one of the supervisory positions for the English Department literary magazine Open Field (or similar magazine): Editor, Assistant Editor, Web Editor, Art/Design Editor. Participation must be supervised by a member of the Department and the work carried out within a single semester. May be repeated for credit. (Fine Arts) G. FREEMAN (CR)