103; 203. Drawing I and II
Interaction with art elements, line, form, space, value, texture, pattern, and color, using limited media. May be repeated as ART 203 taken with a different instructor. No S/U option. (Fine Arts)

104. Studio Art Basics 3D
Introductory-level studio art course exploring art elements, concepts, and history. Three versions are offered on a rotating basis: 2-D, 3-D, and Photo Imaging. No S/U option. (Fine Arts)

151. Art and Culture (W)
A thematic introduction to the subjects of art history, the language, and the methods used in the discipline, with a specific focus on the relationship of form and content. The course examines works of art as expressions of social, intellectual, religious, and aesthetic values. No S/U option. [AH] (Writing Requirement)

207. Photography
An introduction to camera use, black and white film, and darkroom techniques with an emphasis on photography within an art context. The art department will provide students with a 35mm SLR film camera. Prerequisite: any 100-level studio art course. No S/U option. [SA] (Fine Arts)

211. Sculpture
The making of three-dimensional art forms using a variety of techniques, primarily with clay, plaster, and mixed media. Prerequisite: any 100-level studio art course. No S/U option. [SA] (Fine Arts)  

220-222. Topics in Studio Art
See Topics Courses. No S/U option. [SA] (Fine Arts)

223. Utilitarian Ceramics
What is the “language” of pottery and how does it differ from sculpture? What details must artists consider as they create objects for the purpose of utility? In this course, students will use clay to explore pottery forms and the role of functionality today. Students will learn both wheel-throwing and hand-building techniques in order to create utilitarian ceramic objects. Both historical and contemporary pottery will be explored through studio projects, art historical readings/presentations, and individual research. Students will be involved in every step of the ceramic process from mixing clay, forming and glazing functional works of art, and loading/firing kilns. Prerequisite: any 100 level Studio Art course. No S/U option. [SA] (Fine Arts)

224. Sculptural Ceramics
How does ceramics straddle the line between craft and high art? How does an artist use a traditional craft medium, clay, in order to explore sophisticated concepts/ideas? In this course, students will focus on clay as a sculptural medium. Students will learn hand-building techniques, including pinch, coil, and slab, in order to create clay sculptures.  The role and processes of ceramic sculpture will be explored through studio projects, art historical readings/presentations, and individual research. Students will be involved in every step of the ceramic process from mixing clay, forming and glazing sculptural works of art, and loading/firing kilns. Prerequisite: any 100 level Studio Art course. No S/U option. [SA] (Fine Arts)

232; 332. Drawing Life  I and II
A variety of drawing techniques and concepts explored with emphasis on the human figure. May be repeated as ART 332. Alternate years. Prerequisite: any 100-level studio art course. No S/U option. [SA] (Fine Arts)

238. Papermaking
This studio course introduces sculpture, installation, and bookmaking using handmade and found paper. Students make Japanese, Nepalese, and European style papers and review the work of current artists manipulating paper to express ideas. No S/U option. [SA] (Fine Arts)

242. Painting
An introduction to the use of acrylic paint as a fine art medium. Observational, abstract, and non-objective approaches will be explored. Prerequisite: any 100-level studio art course. No S/U option.  [SA] (Fine Arts)

251. Greek and Hellenistic Art
A review of the ancient art of the Mediterranean provides a foundation for an examination of the arts of ancient Greece from the Archaic to the Hellenistic periods. Offered every third year. Elective for Classical Studies majors. No S/U option. [AH] (Humanities)

252. Etruscan and Roman Art
Hellenistic era through the end of the Roman Empire, including the visual arts from the Etruscan peoples to the early Christians. Offered every third year. Elective for Classical Studies majors. No S/U option. [AH] (Humanities)

256. Italian Renaissance Art
The visual arts of Italy from the late medieval period through the end of the sixteenth century. Artists covered include Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael, Donatello, and Titian. Elective for Medieval and Early Modern Studies majors. No S/U option. [AH] (Humanities)

257. Medusa's Gaze: Art/Age of Galileo
Visual arts of Western Europe, from the early seventeenth century to the mid-eighteenth century. Examples of seventeenth-century artists include Caravaggio, Bernini, Borromini, Gentileschi, Rubens, Rembrandt, and Vermeer. Alternate years. Elective for Medieval and Early Modern Studies majors. No S/U option. [AH] (Humanities)

259. Art, Identity, and Revolution: Late Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Art
Investigation of four European movements (Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, and Impressionism) from the mid-eighteenth century through the nineteenth century. Subject to availability of faculty. No S/U option. [AH] (Humanities)

260. Modern Art
Investigation of the development of Modernism and its demise during the second half of the twentieth century. Multiple styles are discussed from the late nineteenth century to 1960. No S/U option. [AH] (Humanities)

263. The Arts of West and Central Africa
Survey of the visual arts of Africa south of the Sahara based on the cycle of life in Africa. Culture and art objects will be discussed thematically, focusing on issues of birth and abundance, initiations, sexuality and partnership, status and royalty, secret societies, as well as death and the ancestors. Topics discussed will include traditional dress, decorated utensils and weapons, body arts, sculpture, painting, weaving, pottery, and architecture. The emphasis will be placed on the object as art form and as conceptual tool to translate socio-political ideas. Offered every third year. Elective for Ethnic Studies major. No S/U option. [AH] (Humanities) 

264. African American Art: Intersectionality in the United States
This course provides an introduction to the visual arts produced by people of African descent in the United States from colonial times to the present. Artists, art movements, the relationship of art to politics, and the formation of racial and cultural identity will be examined. The emphasis will be placed on the object as art form and as conceptual tool to translate socio-political ideas. This course also counts towards the GSS major. Offered every third year. No S/U option. [AH] (Humanities)

265. Arts of the African Diaspora: Latin America and the Caribbean
In this course, the religious and aesthetic practices of West and Central Africa and their significance, preservation, and transformation in the Americas from the period of slavery to the present will be examined. The focus of the class will be on ritual arts such as Vodun, Santeria, Candomble, and Obeah and their cultural impact on Latin America, the Caribbean, and Mexico. Subject to availability of faculty. No S/U option. [AH] (Humanities)

266. American Indian Art: Gender and the Marketplace
Introduces students to traditional and contemporary art made by indigenous individuals and groups in North America. Participants examine sculpture, painting, pottery, textiles, and human adornment. The course is organized according to cultural areas; however, common thematic issues and the effects of colonialism are stressed in discussion and assigned readings. This course also counts towards the GSS major. Offered every third year. No S/U option. [AH] (Humanities)

268. Pre-Columbian Mexico through its Art and Architecture
This class will explore, through the selection of a limited number of works of art and architecture, the rich artistic traditions of pre-Columbian Mexico. Although the course’s geographical and historical reach is large (spanning over 3,000 years of history and a broad swath of North America), the works that we will examine are selective rather than comprehensive, and certain recurring themes will be emphasized in class discussions.  Such themes include: Mesoamerican ruler ship and its representation; various cultures’ approaches to life and death and how they are reflected in art and material culture; Mesoamerican cities and urban planning; materials and “material meanings”; uses of technology in understanding the pre-Columbian world; collecting the pre-Columbian past; and continuities of pre-Columbian culture after 1521.  Class discussions, one field trip, and assigned readings are intended to help students in the critical evaluation of this art. Class sessions will be a mixture of illustrated lectures and discussion. Elective for Latin American Studies majors. [AH] (Humanities)

274-279. Topics in Art History
Various art history offerings at the intermediate level. Courses integrate material from other disciplines. Upcoming topics may include: Masculinity and the Male Nude, Museum Studies (In Chicago, Illinois), Pre-Columbian Art, and Islamic Art and Architecture. See Topics Courses. No S/U option. [AH] (Humanities)

280/380. Internship: See Additional Academic Programs, All-College Independent Study Courses 280/380. No S/U option.

290/390. Individual Project: See Additional Academic Programs, All-College Independent Study Courses 290/390. No S/U option. Half-credit projects are not permitted.

291. Studio Tutorial
Sustained projects in studio art. Prerequisites: a minimum of three college-level art courses, experience in the medium of the tutorial, and permission of the instructor at least two terms in advance. May be repeated for credit. No S/U option. [SA]

292. Art History Tutorial 
An examination of one or more areas of art history not included in the regular offerings, or expanded research of a topic introduced in an art history course previously studied. Prerequisites: a minimum of two college-level art history courses, appropriate experience in the area of proposed study, and permission of the instructor at least two terms in advance. May be repeated for credit. No S/U option. [AH]

306. Intermedia
Production and analysis of time-based visual art. Introduction to the practice, history, and theory of avant-garde visual art in the twentieth century and beyond. Students will work individually and collaboratively with video, sound, performance, photography and the internet. Prerequisite: any 200-level studio art course. Alternate years. No S/U option. [SA] (Fine Arts)

307. Advanced Photography
Advanced work in photography, with opportunity for maximum creative activity. Prerequisite: ART 207. Alternate years. No S/U option.  [SA] (Fine Arts)

310. Collage and Assemblage
Studio course centered on the making, presenting, and analysis of two-and three-dimensional art made from "found" materials. Students are responsible for acquiring suitable materials. Prerequisite: any 200-level studio art course. Alternate years. No S/U option. [SA] (Fine Arts)

312. Sculpture–Casting
The making of three-dimensional art forms using mold-making techniques. Students will cast clay and other sculptural materials. Prerequisite: any 200-level studio art course. Offered every third year. No S/U option. [SA] (Fine Arts) 

343. Observational Painting
Upper-level painting course with an emphasis on looking at the physical world and recording these observations with paint. Subject matter will include still life, human figures, architecture, and landscapes. Prerequisite: ART 242. Offered every third year. No S/U option. [SA] (Fine Arts)

344. Abstract Painting
Upper-level painting course with an emphasis on looking at the physical world and then responding with expressive exaggerations. Prerequisite: ART 242. Offered every third year. No S/U option. [SA] (Fine Arts)

345. Non-Objective Painting
Upper-level painting course that explores the possibility of making paintings that have little or no reference to material reality. Prerequisite: ART 242.  Offered every third year. No S/U option. [SA] (Fine Arts)

353-355. Advanced Topics in Studio Art
See Topics Courses. (Fine Arts)

361. Saints and She-Devils
Examination of some of the most common depictions of women during the late Medieval and Renaissance periods, beginning with Eve and the Virgin Mary. Themes include popular images of the hag, the witch, and the prostitute as well as other depictions that demonstrate how man is led astray by feminine wiles. Readings span from the Bible and Thomas Aquinas to contemporary scholars in gender studies. This course also counts towards the GSS major. Prerequisite: Any 200-level art history course. Alternate years. No S/U option. [AH] (Humanities)

362. Art Since 1960
This course looks at the major movements, aesthetic theories, and critical debates related to art in the late 20th century in order to gain a better understanding of the diversity of contemporary practices. Students will be introduced to minimalism, conceptual art, institutional critique, feminist art, process and body art, postmodernism, and globalism. Prerequisite: Any 200-level art history course. Alternate years. No S/U option. [AH] (Humanities)

363. Feminist Art
Investigation of the feminist art movement of the 1970s to the present, as well as contemporary artwork by women artists. Readings and lectures focus on feminist approaches to gender, ethnicity, class, sexual orientation, and colonialism. This course also counts towards the GSS major. Prerequisite: 200-level art history course or GSS 171. Alternate years. No S/U option. [AH] (Humanities)

364. Rome Reborn: Caput Mundi in Ancient, Renaissance, and Modern Contexts Antiquity, Christianity, and Fascism (in Rome)
This course, traces the history of the Eternal City from antiquity and the world of Julius Caesar and Augustus to the Rome of the early modern popes and the imperialist vision of Fascist dictator Benito Mussolini. Topics include the evolution of the ancient city into the capital of the Roman Empire, the Christianization of Rome and the Church Triumphant of the Counter Reformation as well as urban planning and reconstruction under Mussolini. This course is particularly appropriate for students interested in the use of art, architecture, and urban design as persuasive or visual rhetoric. In Rome. Requires junior/senior standing or completion of a 200-level art history course. Additional fee required. No S/U option. (Humanities)

371. Art Methods
Current K-12 methods in the teaching of art. Special emphasis on the materials and methods needed to be a creative art teacher. Lesson and unit design, computer applications, student assessment, classroom management, and 30 hours of observation and practicum work in the local schools. Required of all Education majors seeking K-6 and/or 7-12 certification recommendation(s) in art. Optional for general elementary education majors. This course cannot be used for credit toward an Art major or minor. Prerequisites:EDU 205, EDU 215, EDU 230, EDU 240, and admission to Teacher Education Program.  No S/U option. (Teacher Preparation)

375-379. Advanced Topics in Art History
Examination of particular themes in art history. The course integrates material from other disciplines. Upcoming topics may include: African Masquerade; Mexican Modernism; The Sistine Chapel; Leonardo, Michelangelo, and Raphael; Monet and the Impressionists; Frida Kahlo and Georgia O'Keeffe; Art and Empire; Classical Architecture; and the City of Rome (In Rome, Italy). Prerequisite: 200-level art history course or permission of instructor. Alternate years. No S/U option. See Topics Courses. [AH] (Humanities)

391. Advanced Studio Tutorial
Sustained projects in studio art. Prerequisites: a minimum of three college-level art courses, experience in the medium of the tutorial, and permission of the instructor at least two terms in advance. May be repeated for credit. No S/U option. [SA]

392. Advanced Art History Tutorial
An examination of one or more areas of art history not included in the regular offerings, or expanded research of a topic introduced in an art history course previously studied. Prerequisites: a minimum of two college-level art history courses, appropriate experience in the area of proposed study, and permission of the instructor at least two terms in advance. May be repeated for credit. No S/U option. [AH]

483. Studio Art Seminar
Readings and discussions about theories of art in conjunction with a studio practicum. Includes a week long stay in Chicago. Additional fees required. No S/U option. Additional Prerequisites: senior standing and declared Studio Art major. [SA]

484. Art History Seminar
Readings and discussions about theories of art and the methodologies of art history with a practicum. Includes a week long stay in Chicago. Additional fees required. Alternate years. No S/U option. Prerequisites: junior standing and declared Art History major. [AH]

487. Senior Thesis
A substantial capstone project to be completed during the senior year. Studio majors conceive, create, and mount an exhibition of a new body of work. Art history majors research an art historical problem, write a research paper, prepare an abstract, and provide a public presentation of their work with the goal of creating an original contribution to the discipline. An oral defense is required for either major. No S/U option.

514. Life Drawing (1/4)
Open studio for working from the human figure. Does not fulfill fine arts credit. (CR) No S/U option.

951. London and Florence: Arts in Context: See See ACM Programs

952. Florence: Arts, Humanities, and Culture: See ACM Programs

967. ACM: Chicago Program - Arts, Entrepreneurship & Urban Studies: See ACM Programs